Ghost Sick—Emily Pohl-Weary

ISBN: 9781926639826

Pub date: 2015

Winner of the 2016 Fred Cogswell Award for Excellence in Poetry!


When a Christmas Eve shooting devastated Emily Pohl-Weary’s community, she began to hunt through the numbness and grief for some understanding and hopefulness about the future. In the tradition of Carolyn Forché, Ernesto Cardenal, and Shu Ting, Ghost Sick is a poetry of witness. It chronicles the impact of violence on an inner-city Toronto neighbourhood, the power of empathy, and the resilience of the human spirit.

“A hard, sad, and beautifully necessary collection of poems. A book that helps us claw our way back from the edges of our own teetering lives.”—Susan Musgrave, author of A Man to Marry, A Man to Bury

“Ghost Sick focuses on violence and its personal cost in a Toronto neighbourhood, starting from the writer’s childhood to the present, the wasted lives, the pain and loss of her own and those of people dear to her.”—Marge Piercy, New York Times bestselling author of Gone to Soldiers

“These are not easy poems to forget, so take a deep breath, and plunge right in. The world will not look the same when you re-emerge, but the rewards are immense: you come away from these poems open to possibility, hopeful for change, and knowing you are not alone in that struggle.”—Carolyn Smart, author of Hooked

“Pohl-Weary’s gritty vernacular got game, got street cred. Like Holocaust witness poet Paul Celan, Pohl-Weary checks tabloids, billboards, newsflashes, for the language to bespeak domesticated violence.”—George Elliot Clarke, Halifax Chronicle-Herald

“The poems in Ghost Sick coalesce into a very strong, coherent collection that should be read from cover to cover . . . this is a book that looks forward towards a better city, better citizens, and a better society.” —Andrew Woodrow-Butcher, Broken Pencil

“Ghost Sick takes your breath away and leaves you wanting more. A great read that makes you think about what it means to bear witness to tragedy.”—Christine Smith (McFarlane), Shameless Magazine

“A nuanced, wrenching and ultimately heart-opening poetry collection that took eight years to write—nearly a decade of trying to grapple with the shooting death of a young man in her Parkdale neighbourhood.” —Yukon News

Ghost Sick by Emily Pohl-Weary is a collection of poems that witness. They are testimony, commentary, and emotional responses to the crime, drugs, loss of innocence and more in a Toronto neighborhood and other places where lives are wasted and lost too easily.”—Serena Agusto-Cox, Savvy Verse and Wit

Emily Pohl-Weary is an award-winning author, editor, arts educator, and academic. She is the author of several books, including the emily-pohl-wearynovels A Girl Like Sugar and Strange Times at Western High; the young adult novel Not Your Ordinary Wolf Girl; the poetry collection Iron-on Constellations; and the biography Better to Have Loved: The Life of Judith Merril, which won a Hugo Award for Best Related Book.

Posted in Award Nominees & Winners, emilypw, G, Poetry, spring 2015, Winter 2015 | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Come Late to the Love of Birds – Sandra Kasturi

Come Late to the Love of BirdsISBN: 9781926639505

Pub date: 2012

3rd place winner—2013 Elgin Awards/2013 Rhysling Award Nominee


Sandra’s first collection, The Animal Bridegroom featured an introduction by Neil Gaiman and has sold out. This collection expands on her themes of abject romances, deformed fairy tales gone and the astonishing delights of life in glorious 21st century. Her latest poetry book fuses nature’s continuous emotional offerings, our desire to understand ourselves with our passion to be free, devoid of the burden of modern thought.
Sandra Kasturi

 

Sandra Kasturi is a writer, publisher, book reviewer and Bram Stoker Award-winning editor. She is the co-owner with her husband, writer and publisher Brett Alexander Savory, of the World Fantasy Award-nominated press, ChiZine Publications. She managed to snag an introduction from Neil Gaiman for her previous poetry collection, The Animal Bridegroom.

Praise for Come Late to the Love of Birds

“Beautiful poems in a jewel box of a collection. You should slow down and take the time to read it.”—Madeline Ashby, author of Company Town 

“Her words are imbued with complexity, multiplicity, and a deep interplay of meanings. Her poetic art is simultaneously completely natural and wholly transcendent.”—Derek Newman-Stille, Speculating Canada

“Stunning turns of phrases”—Diane Severson, Amazing Stories

“Wondrous and lively, full of wit and cunning, and utterly beautiful with each verse and turn of phrase.”—Serena Agusto-Cox, Savvy Verse and Wit

“Kasturi catapults her readers into a parallel universe where dreams shape reality. Beware! She’s a powerful trickster who infuses the everyday with beauty, lust, changelings and not-so-benevolent magic.”—Emily Pohl-Weary, author of Not Your Ordinary Wolf Girl

“Sandra Kasturi’s poetry collection, Come Late to the Love of Birds, is a dazzling journey through a mind awake, an eye alive, and a voice remarkably adept. There is great music here, and magic, and many impossible things you didn’t believe before you read them.”—Patrick O’Leary, author of The Gift and The Black Heart

“Sandra Kasturi’s poems in Come Late to the Love of Birds manage to have both the charm of a particularly beautiful and bright child, while at the same time the grinning bite of a bad seed. A sympathy for roasting birds, a send-up of mythology, the haunted dignity of a hawk—everything she writes has a touch of melancholy about it, but it’s the toy melancholy of the curious and optimistic. How I’d love to be a subject in her world. These poetic tales are funny, absurd, sad, portentous, and completely brilliant. I shall look twice when I next see a bird. I too, have come late to the love of birds—but now I adore them.”—Susie Moloney, author of A Dry Spell and The Thirteen

Praise for The Animal Bridegroom

The Animal Bridegroom is a wonderful showcase for Sandra Kasturi’s work—she has a lot to say and hundreds of ways to say it. Filled with poetry of sheer, spinning invention and genuine passion, none of it comfortable or conventional, this long-awaited book is a genuine pleasure to read.”—Peter Straub, author of A Dark Matter and Mrs. God

“Sandra Kasturi’s magical poems transform the ordinary into the surreal and exotic.”—Phyllis Gotlieb, author of Birthstones and Red Blood, Black Ink, White Paper

Posted in Award Nominees & Winners, C, Catalogue, Fall 2012, Poetry | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

When All My Disappointments Came at Once – Todd Swift


ISBN: 9781926639451

Pub date: 2012

Todd Swift’s eighth poetry collection, When All My Disappointments Came At Once, charts his moving journey back from despair after a series of serious mid-life setbacks, guided by a love of lyrical poetry and its fertile traditions. This groundbreaking book is a Life Studies for our times. It confirms the human heart’s wonderful resilience, and Swift as a poet of the first rank, in terms of style, bravery and integrity of vision. Above all else it is filled with flamboyant poems of great depth and beauty.

“Swift is masterful… an interesting examination of midlife crises, the emotions tied to that, and the rays of hope and comedy that can emerge from those incidents.—Serena Augusto-Cox, Savvy Verse and Wit

About the Author

Dr Todd Swift is Lecturer in English Literature and Creative Writing, at Kingston University, London.  He is Director and Editor of the small press Eyewear Publishing.  Published by the age of 18 in The Fiddlehead, Swift is the prolific author of eight collections of poetry and many more pamphlets. He is editor or co-editor of a dozen anthologies, most recently Lung Jazz: Young British Poets for Oxfam, with a preamble from David Lehman.  His poems have appeared in numerous international publications, such as Poetry (Chicago), Poetry Review (London), and The Globe and Mail (Toronto).  His widely-read blog, Eyewear, has been archived by The British Library.  His PhD is from the University of East Anglia, and is concerned with poetic style and the British poets of the 1940s.  Swift, in his 20s, had a colourful series of freelance jobs, working for Penthouse magazine, and as story-editor on the cult anime show, Sailor Moon, as well as running Canada’s infamous poetry cabaret series, Vox Hunt, which The Globe and Mail called “virtually unique in North America”.  It was during that time, in the 90s, before his move to Budapest, that he was in the band Swifty Lazarus with Tom Walsh, which mixed spoken word and soundscapes in a new way.  Swift lived in Budapest then Paris, in his 30s, before settling in London in 2003. His key themes are sex, violence, religion, love, travel, and style, and he loves 80s music, 50s eyewear, 60s TV, 70s politics, and 40s cinema.

Posted in Catalogue, Poetry, Spring 2012, W | Tagged , , , , , |

Monster | David Livingstone Clink

Monster, by David Livingstone ClinkISBN: 9781926639185
Pub Date: Fall 2010


Monster is a poetry book that Pandora would want to open, containing poems that Eve would bite into. In a sophomore collection that is bound to cause a stir, David Livingstone Clink takes you on a journey into the belly of the beast, a journey that is both dark and surreal, strange and unusual, a departure from the safe neighbourhoods where people don’t lock their doors at night. But all is not dark! There are the unusual and surreal places that bend your mind, that make you look at things you thought you knew but in a different light, and there is humour. But there is also elder abuse, infidelity, molestation, murder, suicide, serial killers and shapeshifters, six-legged dogs and bodies hanging from barn rafters, spiderwebs and fallen cities, steampunk airships muscling into the night, and always the shadows helping us define our shape, how we feel, and, ultimately, who we are.

Click to read an excerpt from Monster.

“Clink’s use of language and poetic form in Monster creates a surreal malaise that readers will swim in, searching for an exit but enticed to stay to uncover the dark truth about themselves.  A dark truth that is worth knowing so that they can move beyond it to a more mindful life.  Another winner in poetry.”—Serena Agusto-Cox, Savvy Verse and Wit

Praise for David Clink’s Eating Fruit Out of Season

“When I picked up Eating Fruit out of Season, Clink’s first full-length poetry collection, I expected mostly to laugh and be amused. Instead, I felt nearly the entire spectrum of human emotion. Clink writes with an earnest necessity I didn’t know was in him.”—Jacob Scheier, Prairie Fire

“Clink’s debut suggests the possibility of a less isolated and obscure voice for the contemporary poet.”—Maurice Mierau, Winnipeg Free Press

“Nowhere in Canadian poetry will the prosaic mind discover verse so barbed and ironic as in this text, while inspired intellects must find it a source of prophetic nostalgia and exquisite, fleshed-out wisdom. Herein is Ontario pastoral and Space-Age romanticism, both scrutinized by a poet who inks truth that is satire.”—George Elliott Clarke, author of Whylah Falls

“I found reading Eating Fruit out of Season to be like, well, like eating fruit out of season—unpredictable, intriguing, not every bite to my taste, but I didn’t want to stop eating.”—Maureen Scott Harris, author of Drowning Lessons

David Livingstone Clink’s poetry has appeared in The Antigonish Review, CV2, The Dalhousie Review, The Fiddlehead, Grain, Literary Review of Canada, The Prairie Journal, and in ten anthologies, including I.V. Lounge Nights, Garden Variety, Imagination in Action, and Tesseracts XIV. He edited the poetry anthology, A Verdant Green. His first book of poetry was Eating Fruit Out of Season. He lives in Toronto.

Posted in Fall 2010, Halloween Sale, M, Poetry, poetrysale, special holiday sale | Tagged , , , , , , |