Excerpt from Wrong Bar, by Nathaniel G Moore

PART ONE: kiss the headlights and put it in neutral

I.

This dingy morning is half eaten.

The store feels empty.

I have been fidgeting by the colourful fish tanks with their hyper-turquoise glamour burbling in the reflection, while outside a prehistoric wind terrifies me with its malignant hissing; it wreathes harsh against the glass with the finesse of a poltergeist. Well, not finesse. It’s smearing the glass in a certain inhumane way: entirely relentless. Maybe finesse, maybe calculating.

A customer prods me with sea queries, reminding me I am not alone. The store is not empty.

“So they last a long time?” The woman is rushed; her eyes go across the tanks, over to a hamster wheel, and back to me. To me, she seems erratic and disenfranchised, not fully comprehending her role as caregiver.

“You’d be surprised,” I go. “How many would you like?” Then, giving a half-crescent smile, “As you may know, it’s half-price fish day here at Sloppy Salmon’s Wet Pet Centre.”

I add the word “wet” for syllabic resonance. Ten in the morning, four customers, and my face is already a clock of sweat, my skin iridescent and convivial. That’s probably not the right word. My skin tingles in chatter, if tingles could speak. Not tingles so much as itches.

Maybe it’s glue or something.

The mother asks her son what he thinks. The kid shrugs. I begin to unravel, not literally, of course—“Look, I’m under cover,” I tell them. I feel light-headed. “This is a sting operation.”


For more information about Wrong Bar or to purchase the book, please click here.

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Wrong Bar | Nathaniel G. Moore

Wrong Bar, by Nathaniel G Moore
ISBN: 9781926639024
Price: $18.95
Pub Date: Fall 2009

Shortlisted for the 2010 ReLit Award for Best Novel!

“Few writers can take their own finger poppin’ rhythm and make it sound exactly like life. Nathaniel G. Moore’s filthy and pretty little dust devil made me feel slutty and happy and free. Terrific book.”—Tony Burgess, author of Pontypool Changes Everything

Nathaniel G. Moore describes his third book as what would happen if he had written Brighton Rock now, in the age of Twitter.  When Maudlin City writer Charles Haas wakes up in a make-shift grave complete with windowpane roof, he realized two things: firstly, it’s a scene from one of his abandoned manuscripts, and secondly, he must stop showing his writing to strangers.

While still fresh in the dirt, Charles becomes obsessed with the city’s enfants terrible who are in the midst of plotting a demonic dance party hoax, led by the evil eighteen-year-old Shawn Michaels. Consumed by the throngs of hate-toting teens, Charles is convinced that they are  hacking themselves into a post-avatar oblivion, and that they will definitely leave him for dead.

Wrong Bar is a novel that  refuses to celebrate the wild child within, instead seeking the greater emotional truth behind the teen-aged psychodramatic passions of a deranged generation thriving in the post-sacred era.

Click to read an excerpt from Wrong Bar.

Praise for Wrong Bar

“Prepare to be hurled at breakneck speed through the brilliantly imaginative mind of one of this country’s small-press marvels.” —Edward Brown, The Globe & Mail

“It’s as if cut-up technician William S. Burroughs joined MySpace.” —Mark Medley, The National Post

Nathaniel G. Moore is the author of Bowlbrawl, Let’s Pretend We Never Met, Pastels Are Pretty Much The Polar Opposite of Chalk, and co-editor of Toronto Noir.

Posted in Award Nominees & Winners, Catalogue, Fall 2009, Novels, W | Tagged , , |

GULCH | Ed. Sarah Beaudin, Karen C. Da Silva, & Curran Folkers

DOWN WITH ARBOREAL THOUGHT! // A Steel Bananas Project

GULCH, edited by Karen C. Da Silva, Curran Folkers & Sarah Beaudin
ISBN: 9781926639079

Pub Date: Fall 2009

“From its opening statement, ‘This Book Is a Rhizome,’ to Adebe D.A.’s ‘Poemagogy,’ to John Unrau’s ‘New Age Muskie Considers a Change of Lifestyle,’ Gulch privileges the rhetoric of (and itself exists as an example of) that ever-regenerative genre, the manifesto.”
— Andrew Dubois, University of Toronto Quarterly 80.2

“…the reliability of GULCH is the space it provides for new visions, new styles and new writers.”
Rabble Magazine

“Gulch plays with the idea of collaboration and does it well, with a buffet of new and exciting work from today’s up and coming talent.”
Broken Pencil Magazine

Inspired by the theories of Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari, GULCH: An Assemblage of Poetry and Prose is a rhizomatic exploration of the modern Canadian literary community.

Drawing on the postmodern themes of detachment and disjuncture, GULCH seeks to create an optimistic snapshot of the pluralities and complexities that constitute the post-pomo literary landscape. Focusing on the theme of fragmentation, Steel Bananas members Sarah Beaudin, Karen Correia Da Silva and Curran Folkers have collected pieces from community artists, Professors, lit students, burgeoning young talent as well as established writers in order to compile a collection that resists the notion of wholeness, privileging instead the multiplicity and diversity found in contemporary globalized culture. This assemblage of poetry and prose bares the innovation and cultural critique of post-millennium Canadian writers, and seeks to expose the beauty of discontinuity.

Featuring work from Adebe D.A., Stephen Cain, Ewan Whyte, Spencer Gordon, Chris Felling, Matthew Hall, Daniel Tysdal, Chris Eaton & Virtual Collaborators, Amanda Lee, JJ Steinfeld, Emma Healy, Wally Keeler, Jon Eskedjian, Vincent De Freitas, Craig Alexander, Heather Babcock, Richard Rosenbaum, Jerry Levy, Alex Consiglio, Sarah Beaudin, Ursula Pflug, Kathleen Brown, Matthew Moliterni, Darryl Salach, Shannon Robinson, Miles Henry, Shannon Webb Campbell, John Unrau, Nathaniel G Moore, Zack Kotzer, Firdaus Bilimoria, Jimmy McInnes, Steph Tracey, James Arthur, Melanie Janisse, Corrigan Hammond, N Dana Jerabek, Shannon Maguire, Ryan Tannenbaum, Karen Correia Da Silva, James Papoutsis, Christopher Olsen, Alyksandra Ackerman, Curran Folkers, James Hatch, John C Goodman, Andrew McEwan, John Nyman, Mark Reble, Jamie Ross, Devon Wong, N Alexander Armstrong.

Click to read an excerpt from GULCH.

Curran Folkers, Karen Correia Da Silva, and Sarah Beaudin of Steel Bananas

Steel Bananas is a not-for-profit art collective and culture zine. They publish a rag-bag of contemporary Canadian writers and art-bums on the 15th of each month, aiming to critically and playfully explore contemporary cultural theory and the varying facets of contemporary urban culture. They’re proud to augment all virtual content with print media or in-the-flesh art happenings around Toronto, and to support independent, alternative, and marginal art in Canada.

http://www.steelbananas.com

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