Excerpt from GULCH, “Poemagogy”

Poemagogy ::::: Adebe D.A.

Traffic sweat drips
flashing whiz children with red lips
neon age, yellow hallways
no decor
just wind: the age of reason.

I tried to reason with a lamppost
whatcha burning for? so many dead stars
like you dizzying up the streets, hardly any room
unlike a galaxy

but it wasn’t really a lamppost
and I wasn’t reasoning;

it was the simple act of pressing
palm to palm to
grape white saintliness,
the point at which a light
is formed and carries you forever

when it does not take off
with the wind
but remains like a question

the psychodynamic arc
of city life, trapping and liberation
Parlafilms:

where we speak as though
destroyed, where we only desire
to become something new.

Constant toil in the life of art!
the assemblage
slaveships deathtrains clubs
Eeenough
our reality (swallow)
too much, these bells
summon what enabled us to clash

first into the night
like palms
when we are strong
with the
not yet,
with the beauty of now

when we lift high
the banner of reason
to run across lines of flight,
of light, singing
how every life shall be a song
or certainly some sense of mattering

of being indivisible – that is the only desire
there is, to be enabled with passing
words that foam
like seas deep with dark

to reducible neither to the One
nor the multiple,
to become not you
or two, three four five
nor to add you to myself

for we have all
always been in motion:
our dimension is the same,
lovers are
just interlocutors in general,
radical disturbances

like subway trains, a kiss, a missed stop:
the shock of the encounter
when beauty exceeds
the limits of the rational

the unscripted sublimity
of the earth, this place
we inhabit on loan.

The dead poets keep telling me
anonymity is a lie, this city just another point
of departure

that desire is just sympathy, not filiation; that we are angels,
alloys, the wind

that our roots are rhizomes,
our lives creatio ex amore,
multiplicity is what has borne the city
is what has borne us, we are still being
birthed again, and up, and away.


For more information about GULCH or to purchase the book, please click here.

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Excerpt from Confessions of a Reluctant Cougar, “Man #1020”

Man #1020

Screen name: Renaissance Man

Favourite Quote: “If music be the food of love, play on, / Give me excess of it; that surfeiting, / The appetite may sicken, and so die.”

Self-description: Confident, hopeless romantic who will read you poetry and take walks along the moonlit beach with you.

Likes: Smart, sexy, petite women. Exotic types.

Dislikes: Smokers, drinkers, sex addicts,

Religion: Christian

Favourite movie moment: Charlton Heston parting the Dead Sea in The Ten Commandments.

Motto: “I’ll sleep when I’m dead.”

Sex is all about the love with him “neo-Platonic” love to be exact. Connected to God and to all living things. He confounds her with elevated talk, spiritual idealism, and antiquated romantic notions.

“You are like a rose,” William says enigmatically.

“Does that mean I have thorns?” she teases, sweeping back her thick brown hair.

“No, you haven’t any. You’re a red rose with a hint of black. And eyes like Countess Bathory.”

Olivia smiles serenely, as though men have been treating her this way for centuries. She wonders to herself, Is he for real?

Later she looks up Countess Bathory on the Internet and discovers she murdered her housemaids to bathe in their fresh, young blood. Countess Bathory thought she had discovered the secret to the fountain of youth. There were fifty-odd dead in the castle basement by the time they caught up with her. Most accounts describe her as a vampire—terrified of aging, remarkably seductive. Olivia wonders if William really knows the whole story or whether he just likes the name Bathory, having heard it in passing.

Olivia has been a member of half a dozen online dating sites without much luck, until now. No one ever turned out to be who they said they were. It wasn’t that they were liars, though some of them were. People were just short-sighted. They saw themselves as they wanted to be seen. Even after she had closed her accounts on most of the sites, she still saved a copy of each profile from the men she’d dated. She even created a profile for men she hadn’t met online. It turned out to be a good way to keep track of them, especially if she was dating more than one at a time. It was her own private Dewey Decimal System for relationships that she stored in a folder marked ‘Personal.”

Olivia and William are walking across the grassy quad at York where he is a TA in art history and religion classes. Several young girls with knapsacks and tight jeans—girls Olivia has long since learned not to envy—eye her boyfriend, trying to catch his attention with a smile or by tossing back their long hair.

William takes her hand as they’re walking. She looks over at his earnest profile, a face that betrays no trace of the hardship he says he has endured. It is unlined and unspoiled. At thirty-five, William is eighteen years younger than Olivia. The creases around her eyes soften in his company.

William brings her red roses. He kisses her voluptuously. He makes her believe in love again, instead of just sex.


For more information about Confessions of a Reluctant Cougar or to purchase the book, please click here.

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An excerpt from “Paradox”, in Danila Botha’s Got No Secrets

Paradox

“Mother, mother, can you hear me? Sure I’m sober, sure I’m sane.

Life is perfect, never better, still your daughter, still the same.

My mother calls me immediately after dinner. My cellphone’s ring beats at my brain like a jackhammer; even though I have call display, I pick it up, just to make it shut up. She doesn’t know about anything that goes on in my life. She doesn’t know what subjects I’m taking, what I like studying, what I do any night of the week. She just wants to know that her investment is working out well—that her daughter will one day become a respected professional that is actually worth something. I hope I don’t live that long. I tell her that I’m fine, that the test went well, that I’m going to have to spend another night at the library. Another project for my abnormal psychology class. A lot of research. Periodicals, you know. I’ll probably see her in the morning, maybe.

I can’t believe she buys it.

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Excerpt from Wrong Bar, by Nathaniel G Moore

PART ONE: kiss the headlights and put it in neutral

I.

This dingy morning is half eaten.

The store feels empty.

I have been fidgeting by the colourful fish tanks with their hyper-turquoise glamour burbling in the reflection, while outside a prehistoric wind terrifies me with its malignant hissing; it wreathes harsh against the glass with the finesse of a poltergeist. Well, not finesse. It’s smearing the glass in a certain inhumane way: entirely relentless. Maybe finesse, maybe calculating.

A customer prods me with sea queries, reminding me I am not alone. The store is not empty.

“So they last a long time?” The woman is rushed; her eyes go across the tanks, over to a hamster wheel, and back to me. To me, she seems erratic and disenfranchised, not fully comprehending her role as caregiver.

“You’d be surprised,” I go. “How many would you like?” Then, giving a half-crescent smile, “As you may know, it’s half-price fish day here at Sloppy Salmon’s Wet Pet Centre.”

I add the word “wet” for syllabic resonance. Ten in the morning, four customers, and my face is already a clock of sweat, my skin iridescent and convivial. That’s probably not the right word. My skin tingles in chatter, if tingles could speak. Not tingles so much as itches.

Maybe it’s glue or something.

The mother asks her son what he thinks. The kid shrugs. I begin to unravel, not literally, of course—“Look, I’m under cover,” I tell them. I feel light-headed. “This is a sting operation.”


For more information about Wrong Bar or to purchase the book, please click here.

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Exerpt from “Haunted: An Introduction”, found in In the Dark

Sitting down in your favourite armchair to read this book, you’ll hear the soft swish as you meander from story to story and you’ll think to yourself that the sound of paged turning is soothing. But that’s not the whisper of paper you hear, it’s something else.

Don’t you know? Ghosts haunt books more than any place else: the ghosts of past readers and borrowers, the ghosts of protagonists and antagonists. Ephemeral words have their own ghosts, spirits descending on the arcing trajectory of metamorphed ancient languages. There is no more spook- ridden activity than the reading of books.

And ghosts love books about ghosts more than anything else, for ghosts, if nothing else, are more self-absorbed than the living. So before you sit down quietly at 2:00a.m. ti read this book (for when you read a book of ghost stories, it is always 2:00 a.m.), there are some things I must tell you. Some things to warn you about…


For more information about In the Dark: Stories from the Supernatural or to purchase the book, please click here.

 

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Tightrope Books launches Jim Nason and Ruth Roach Pierson

Tightrope BooksJoin Tightrope Books at Proof, the Vodka Bar in the Intercontinental Hotel from 3 – 6 pm to launch new books by Jim Nason and Ruth Roach Pierson.

Jim Nason’s collection of shorts stories is entitled The Girl on the Escalator. The characters in theses eleven stories live in a world upside down. From the young professional who leaves her high-powered job to explore street life as a graffiti artist, to the gay man who falls in love… with a woman. Jim Nason has crafted a collection of gender- and expectation-bending stories that reveal the extraordinary and often heartbreaking truths of ordinary life.

Also being launched will be Ruth Roach Pierson’s third poetry collection, Contrary. While humour, fond remembrance, and wry awareness break through, contrariness tinges many of the poems in this collection, a contrariness rooted in rueful self-examination. These are poems that mount an opposition, poems that contradict and argue, sometimes in jest, sometimes in deadly seriousness, poems that read unexpected messages into painting and photographs.

RSVP on Facebook!

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Tell Your Sister | Andrew Daley

Tell Your Sister, by Andrew Daley
ISBN: 9780973864571
Pub Date: 2007


Unflinching and mordantly funny, this debut novel about blind loyalty, first girlfriends, bowling alleys, big hair bands, petty crime and betrayal is an evocative, unforgettable kind of love story.

Click to read an excerpt from Tell Your Sister.

“I do recommend you read this book”—Rebecca Rosenblum, Rose-Coloured Reviews

I would read more by this author. Way to go for a first novel.”—goodreads.com

Andrew Daley is a former editor of  Toronto’s Taddle Creek Magazine. His work has appeared in several magazines including Kiss Machine. Tell Your Sister is his first novel.

Posted in Catalogue, Novels, T | Tagged , , , , , |

Like I Care – Stephen Guppy

Like I CareISBN 9781926639536



Like I Care is set in Vancouver a year or two into the future, when everything is just like it is now, apart from the invasion of monsters from Japanese Horror movies, the frequent earthquakes, and the army of scooter-riding Yé-Yé girls taking over the streets. The characters include a couple of families who live in an upscale suburb. Arnold is a struggling real-estate agent who is going through a divorce from Katherine, who believes she is Princess Diana. Their daughter, Christiana, is an aspiring model. Lawrence, their neighbour, has retired from his civil service career and is now a consultant who specializes in writing pointless mission statements. He’s plotting an affair with a young woman who belongs to a cannibal cult led by a chef who has created the perfect Canadian cuisine—eating the corrupt. Lawrence’s blended family includes Dorothy, his wife, and her son Thomas, who has dropped out of university and discovered that his true vocation is watching daytime TV. They’re all about to be transformed through the influence of legendary New-Age financier and evangelist of globalization Mitchell Mobius. Thomas becomes his evil twin, Raoul, and joins Mobius in founding a company that markets obsolete trends. Christiana is transformed into a media icon without her knowledge or consent. Arnold also jumps on the Mitchell Mobius bandwagon and finds himself in Taiwan just in time for the invasion. Fear, uncertainty, disinformation: that’s the mantra of the 21st century, and Arnold and his friends are living it to the hilt.

“A fast moving (and fast reading!) romp of a novel… smart, funny, and enjoyable…“—Necessary Fiction

Stephen GuppyPraise for Stephen Guppy’s first novel, The Fire Thief:

“…a masterful piece of storytelling, with well-drawn characters and imagined situations that seem all too real”—The Saskatoon Star-Phoenix

“Guppy sharply evokes character and milieu in dialogue and prose that are skillfully-shaped.”—The Vancouver Sun

Stephen Guppy is the author of several books including The Fire Thief (novel) The Work of Mercy (stories), Understanding Heaven (poems) which was shortlisted for the BC Book Award/Dorothy Livesay Award for Poetry.

Posted in Catalogue, Fall 2012, L, Novels | Tagged , , , |

Dirty Bird – Keir Lowther

Dirty BirdISBN: 9781926639529

Winner: 2013 Margaret and John Savage First Book Award
Shortlisted: 2013 Thomas Head Raddall Atlantic Fiction Prize, 2013 Relit Award in the Novel Category, 2014 PEI Book Award for Fiction

CBC Literary Award finalist Keir Lowther makes his debut with a novel that revolves around loved ones dead and alive, family or otherwise that haunts the modern psyche of one young boy, trapped in the grotesque world that surrounds him. Written in a creepy, deadpan, dark spiritual tone that will light a powder keg in the lukewarm waters of Canadian fiction. Dirty Bird is a family dystopia saga of anxiety and misplaced love, carved out in the spirit of spooky tradition of writers such as Tony Burgess, Joey Comeau and Lisa Foad.

Keir Lowther’s Dirty Bird gets between your teeth. It leaves silt in your bed sheets and second-hand smoke in your hair. It’s a neo-Canadian gothic tale of dysfunction, hallucination, and denial. It will make you feel sick, weak all over, but you’ll love it. You’ll crawl around for days after finishing it, wishing for more. This book breaks into your brain – but you’ll have to read it to know what that really means.” —Liz Worth, author of Treat Me Like Dirt

“This debaucherous debut from Keir Lowther does not deal in pig-tailed orphans or raspberry cordial. Instead it delivers a darkly gothic PEI—made of grit, grime, and grotesquerie—in which the wronged dead crawl from their graves to track mud across your clean kitchen floor. Dirty Bird is a devilish, desperate plea from one very disturbed little boy who spends his summer longing for Happy Meals and coming of age among adults with human hearts and savage, animalistic appetites. This book reminds you of every bad thing you ever did and shames you for it. Dirty Bird will raze your brain and haunt your dreams and leave you begging for more.”—Matthew J. Trafford, author of The Divinity Gene

“There are serene moments in the book that breathe clean air into its dirty pages. But it’s the dirty moments that earn Lowther his ribbon; his ability to make small town tragedies new again, and make innocence unnerving, and his knack for writing about an off-kilter family from a tiny island out east that leaves us feeling bad on the inside.”—Colin Brush, Broken Pencil

“I’ll never forget this book… So real and gritty.”—goodreads.com

“We need more writers like Keir Lowther”—libeery.tumblr.com

Keir LowtherKeir Lowther lives in Prince Edward Island with his wife, daughter, and dog. His great grandfather was Lucy Maud Montgomery’s first cousin.

Posted in Award Nominees & Winners, Catalogue, D, Fall 2012, Novels | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , |

Got No Secrets | Danila Botha

Got No Secrets, by Danila BothaISBN: 9781926639086
Pub Date: 2010

A startling and original new voice that owes as much to Black Flag and Bikini Kill as it does to J.D. Salinger and Heather O’Neill. A South African copywriter is transplanted to the urban jungle of Manhattan. A recovering rape victim tries to resume a normal life. A Toronto nurse cuts herself to fill her emptiness. In Got No Secrets, Danila Botha takes us into the private lives of twelve different women, with only one question in mind: What if these women were you? From addiction to abuse, from childhood to suicide, from Hillbrow, Johannesburg, to downtown Toronto, Botha’s prose is compassionate, provocative, often funny, and always fearless.

“Intensely original and fantastically written.”—The Literary Lollipop

“Danila Botha is an emerging literary lioness on Canada’s literary landscape… Got No Secrets packs an emotional wallop…powerful and poignant…an honest and freshly forthright debut that is filled with the headaches and heartburns of youth gone awry…”—The Halifax Chronicle Herald

“Danila Botha’s debut collection of short stories makes the personal political. With clear diction, Botha’s prose packs a punch. There’s no skirting the issues, masquerading behind metaphor or dancing between the lines.”—The Coast

“The writing is stark, honest and stripped-down, making no excuses, just like the classic punks that see frequent mention throughout. The question that Got No Secrets asks is: exactly where does bad parenting end and self-determination begin?”—Broken Pencil

“Botha’s story telling technique seamlessly blends tragedy and humour, making this collection a must have”—Reading the Rails, Toronto Word on the Street

Click here to read an excerpt from Got No Secrets.

Danila Botha was born in Johannesburg, South Africa. She volunteered with Na-me-res, an organization benefiting the homeless, which inspired many of the stories in Got No Secrets. Her writing has appeared in 24 Hours, Yoink! Magazine, and NOW. She lives in Toronto. http://www.danilabotha.com

Posted in Catalogue, G, Short Fiction, Spring 2010 | Tagged , , , , , , |

Standing in the Whale’s Jaw – Kathy-Diane Leveille

Standing-in-the-whale's-jaw PROMOISBN: 9781926639611

Fifteen-year-old Elsa Byrd is on the verge of becoming a woman in the summer of 1935. It seems to her that, in a world run by men, coming of age is more of a curse than a blessing. Elsa feels powerless when her father enters the tuberculosis sanitarium and she’s forced to live on her grandparents’ farm. When she stumbles upon a stranger hiding in the barn, it’s a welcome diversion as hiding him becomes an intoxicating secret. When a dead girl is discovered floating in a dory, it quickly shifts from the kind of secret Elsa wants to hug close, to the kind she doesn’t dare let out. Her mentor, Lavinia Twigg, joins the police investigation and Elsa’s caught between silence and disclosure, trust and doubt, risk and fear.

“Nineteen thirties rural New Brunswick shines in this multi-layered, coming-of-age murder mystery. The lives of women, and the expectations surrounding them, are portrayed with insight and sympathy. I hope we hear from Elsa Byrd and Lavinia Twigg again—they make a first-rate detective team.” —Laurie Glenn Norris, author, Haunted Girl: Esther Cox and the Great Amherst Mystery

“Murder mystery enthusiasts will be completely satiated. Leveille has brilliantly concocted scenarios
where several individuals make plausible suspects.”—Michelle Brunet, Arts East

Kathy-Diane Leveille is the author of the novel Let the Shadows Fall Behind You and the short story collection Roads Unravelling. Her prose has been published in a number of literary journals, including the Cormorant, Grain, the Oklahoma Review, Pottersfield Portfolio, and Room of One’s Own, as well as various anthologies such as New Brunswick Short Stories and Water Studies: New Voices in Maritime Fiction. Her fiction won the Short Grain Contest for dramatic monologue in 2000 and was listed as a finalist in the Writers’ Union of Canada Short Fiction Contest in 2002. She lives in Saint John, New Brunswick.

Posted in Novels, S, Spring 2013, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , |

Your Love is Murder or the Case of the Mangled Pie | Paul Hong

Your Love is Murder, by Paul Hong
ISBN-13: 9780973864526

Pub Date: 2006

Fall in love with Julia, an adolescent guerrilla; witness Robin wax philosophic with Batman on regret and loss.

Paul Hong unloads animals, superheros, Korean children, and a Native elder into a big city that rhymes with Doronto. Any reader is like the detective that weaves through this collection of short stories to uncover everyday mysteries. Hong’s stories are a blend of hearsay, folklore and opaque traditions leading us to the simple treasures buried beneath our feet.

Click to read an excerpt from Your Love is Murder.

Toronto writer Paul Hong‘s short fiction, inspired by everything from religious parables to pulp fiction, has appeared in Blood and Aphorisms, Broken Pencil, Mix Magazine, Kiss Machine and in the anthology Geeks, Misfits and Outlaws edited by Zoe Whittall. Hes also the advice columnist, formerly known as Mr. Well-Hung, for Kiss Machine magazine since 2001.

Posted in Catalogue, Short Fiction, Y | Tagged , , , , |

After the Fires | Ursula Pflug

After the Fires, by Ursula Pflug
ISBN: 9780978335120
Pub Date: 2008

Shortlisted for a 2009 Aurora Award!

 

The stories in After the Fires light the dark places where reality burns away to reveal something fantastical.

In these stories Ursula Pflug’s worlds unfold like waking dreams where what was forgotten is remembered. Her narrators accept these shadow worlds as their truth and the reader is seduced into following along to see what has been refashioned and lies waiting to be discovered among the ashes that remain after the fires.

“A mind-tantalising book… evidence of a significant North American short-story writer”—DF Lewis, Dreamcatcher Real-time Reviews

“Ursula Pflug’s stories are the kind you want to carry around with you for those days when it feels like you’re living in a strange and incomprehensible world; her stories will make you feel less alone. They are wondrous and unique little creatures… they are sly and joyous, scary and entrancing, profound, unsettling, amusing, and utterly—perfectly!—unique.” —Matthew Cheney, editor, Best American Fantasy

Click to read an excerpt from After the Fires.

Ursula Pflug is author of the novel Green Music (Tesseract Books, 2002.) She is also an award winning short story writer, professionally produced playwright, book reviewer, and creative writing instructor.

Posted in A, Award Nominees & Winners, Catalogue, Short Fiction | Tagged , , , , , , |

Etcetera and Otherwise | Sean Stanley

Etcetera and Otherwise, by Sean Stanley
ISBN-13: 9780978335168

Pub Date: 2008

Bookstore owner Otherwise meets the beautiful Etcetera one afternoon when she comes into his store. They begin a fantastical erotic road trip that will last twenty-eight days. While travelling they meet characters such as The Marketer, a man who markets the most remarkable goods, and the waitress that falls into the fat fryer and is eaten by the Fat Friar. As Otherwise falls deeply in love, the mystery of Etcetera grows, until at the end of twenty-eight days, his questions are answered, including the most important of all, do you love me?

Sean Stanley grew up in the woods of Northern Ontario.

Kristi-Ly Green (Illustrator) lives in Christie-Ossington. Her book of short stories, Nits (Exile, 2000), was short-listed for the 2001 ReLit Awards. Her work has appeared in Exile, The Scrivener, Fireweed, The New Quarterly, and Room of One’s Own.

Posted in Catalogue, E, Novels | Tagged , , , , |

Wrong Bar | Nathaniel G. Moore

Wrong Bar, by Nathaniel G Moore
ISBN: 9781926639024
Price: $18.95
Pub Date: Fall 2009

Shortlisted for the 2010 ReLit Award for Best Novel!

“Few writers can take their own finger poppin’ rhythm and make it sound exactly like life. Nathaniel G. Moore’s filthy and pretty little dust devil made me feel slutty and happy and free. Terrific book.”—Tony Burgess, author of Pontypool Changes Everything

Nathaniel G. Moore describes his third book as what would happen if he had written Brighton Rock now, in the age of Twitter.  When Maudlin City writer Charles Haas wakes up in a make-shift grave complete with windowpane roof, he realized two things: firstly, it’s a scene from one of his abandoned manuscripts, and secondly, he must stop showing his writing to strangers.

While still fresh in the dirt, Charles becomes obsessed with the city’s enfants terrible who are in the midst of plotting a demonic dance party hoax, led by the evil eighteen-year-old Shawn Michaels. Consumed by the throngs of hate-toting teens, Charles is convinced that they are  hacking themselves into a post-avatar oblivion, and that they will definitely leave him for dead.

Wrong Bar is a novel that  refuses to celebrate the wild child within, instead seeking the greater emotional truth behind the teen-aged psychodramatic passions of a deranged generation thriving in the post-sacred era.

Click to read an excerpt from Wrong Bar.

Praise for Wrong Bar

“Prepare to be hurled at breakneck speed through the brilliantly imaginative mind of one of this country’s small-press marvels.” —Edward Brown, The Globe & Mail

“It’s as if cut-up technician William S. Burroughs joined MySpace.” —Mark Medley, The National Post

Nathaniel G. Moore is the author of Bowlbrawl, Let’s Pretend We Never Met, Pastels Are Pretty Much The Polar Opposite of Chalk, and co-editor of Toronto Noir.

Posted in Award Nominees & Winners, Catalogue, Fall 2009, Novels, W | Tagged , , |

Be Good-Stacey May Fowles

Be Good, by Stacey May FowlesISBN-13: 9780978335106
Longlisted for the 2008 Relit Award

 

In this gritty first novel by Stacey May Fowles, a group of Canadian twenty-somethings wrestle with sex, love, and lies. Each character has a distinct persona made of secrets and deceptions, which is shattered by the end of the book.

Set against the acutely drawn urban landscapes of Montreal and Vancouver, Morgan and Hannah struggle to navigate the maze of love affairs, failed relationships, obsessions, and departures from the familiar.

Deftly shifting perspective from the innocent and idealistic Hannah to the streetwise and damaged Morgan, to their friends and the men in their lives, Be Good eloquently exposes the lies we tell ourselves and others in order to cope with life and reveals the ongoing alienation and isolation of a world where the only reliable narrator is the future.

“…the novel offers a thoughtful examination of sexuality, relationships, and what it means to tell the truth.”—Quill and Quire

“…probably the most finely realized small press novel to come out of Canada in the last year.”—This Magazine

Click to read an excerpt from Be Good.

Stacey May Fowles‘ written work has been published in various magazines and journals, including Shameless Magazine, Kiss Machine, and subTERRAIN . Her non-fiction writing has been anthologized in the widely acclaimed Nobody Passes: Rejecting the Rules of Gender and Conformity and First Person Queer. Be Good is her first novel.

Posted in Award Nominees & Winners, B, Catalogue, Novels | Tagged , , |

GULCH | Ed. Sarah Beaudin, Karen C. Da Silva, & Curran Folkers

DOWN WITH ARBOREAL THOUGHT! // A Steel Bananas Project

GULCH, edited by Karen C. Da Silva, Curran Folkers & Sarah Beaudin
ISBN: 9781926639079

Pub Date: Fall 2009

“From its opening statement, ‘This Book Is a Rhizome,’ to Adebe D.A.’s ‘Poemagogy,’ to John Unrau’s ‘New Age Muskie Considers a Change of Lifestyle,’ Gulch privileges the rhetoric of (and itself exists as an example of) that ever-regenerative genre, the manifesto.”
— Andrew Dubois, University of Toronto Quarterly 80.2

“…the reliability of GULCH is the space it provides for new visions, new styles and new writers.”
Rabble Magazine

“Gulch plays with the idea of collaboration and does it well, with a buffet of new and exciting work from today’s up and coming talent.”
Broken Pencil Magazine

Inspired by the theories of Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari, GULCH: An Assemblage of Poetry and Prose is a rhizomatic exploration of the modern Canadian literary community.

Drawing on the postmodern themes of detachment and disjuncture, GULCH seeks to create an optimistic snapshot of the pluralities and complexities that constitute the post-pomo literary landscape. Focusing on the theme of fragmentation, Steel Bananas members Sarah Beaudin, Karen Correia Da Silva and Curran Folkers have collected pieces from community artists, Professors, lit students, burgeoning young talent as well as established writers in order to compile a collection that resists the notion of wholeness, privileging instead the multiplicity and diversity found in contemporary globalized culture. This assemblage of poetry and prose bares the innovation and cultural critique of post-millennium Canadian writers, and seeks to expose the beauty of discontinuity.

Featuring work from Adebe D.A., Stephen Cain, Ewan Whyte, Spencer Gordon, Chris Felling, Matthew Hall, Daniel Tysdal, Chris Eaton & Virtual Collaborators, Amanda Lee, JJ Steinfeld, Emma Healy, Wally Keeler, Jon Eskedjian, Vincent De Freitas, Craig Alexander, Heather Babcock, Richard Rosenbaum, Jerry Levy, Alex Consiglio, Sarah Beaudin, Ursula Pflug, Kathleen Brown, Matthew Moliterni, Darryl Salach, Shannon Robinson, Miles Henry, Shannon Webb Campbell, John Unrau, Nathaniel G Moore, Zack Kotzer, Firdaus Bilimoria, Jimmy McInnes, Steph Tracey, James Arthur, Melanie Janisse, Corrigan Hammond, N Dana Jerabek, Shannon Maguire, Ryan Tannenbaum, Karen Correia Da Silva, James Papoutsis, Christopher Olsen, Alyksandra Ackerman, Curran Folkers, James Hatch, John C Goodman, Andrew McEwan, John Nyman, Mark Reble, Jamie Ross, Devon Wong, N Alexander Armstrong.

Click to read an excerpt from GULCH.

Curran Folkers, Karen Correia Da Silva, and Sarah Beaudin of Steel Bananas

Steel Bananas is a not-for-profit art collective and culture zine. They publish a rag-bag of contemporary Canadian writers and art-bums on the 15th of each month, aiming to critically and playfully explore contemporary cultural theory and the varying facets of contemporary urban culture. They’re proud to augment all virtual content with print media or in-the-flesh art happenings around Toronto, and to support independent, alternative, and marginal art in Canada.

http://www.steelbananas.com

Posted in Anthologies, Catalogue, Fall 2009, G | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |