Best Canadian Essays 2016

9781988040110-bce-2016ISBN: 9781988040110
Price: 21.95




Featuring trusted series editor Christopher Doda and acclaimed guest editor Joseph Kertes, this eighth installment of Canada’s annual volume of essays showcases diverse nonfiction writing from across the country. Culled from leading Canadian magazines and journals, Best Canadian Essays 2016 contains award-winning and award-nominated nonfiction articles that are topical and engaging and have their finger on the pulse of our contemporary psyches.

Contributors: Carleigh Baker, Graeme Bayliss, Desmond Cole, Krista Foss, Don Gillmor, Wayne A. Hunt, Michelle Kaeser, Richard Kelly Kemick, Susan Olding, Richard Poplak, Michael Rowe, Kenneth Sherman, Antanas Sileika, Fred Stenson, Leona Theis, Elana Wolff.

Christopher Doda is a poet, editor and critic living in Toronto. He is the author of two books of poetry, Among Ruins and Aesthetics Lesson. His award-winning nonfiction has appeared in journals across Canada and he was on the editorial board of Exile Editions for over ten years.

Joseph Kertes’ first novel, Winter Tulips, won the Stephen Leacock Award for Humour. His third novel, Gratitude, won a Canadian Jewish Book Award and the U.S. National Jewish Book Award for Fiction. His most recent novel is The Afterlife of Stars.

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MESS: THE HOSPITAL ANTHOLOGY

ISBN: 9781926639543
PRICE: $15.95 special sale price—save $6!




In this compelling anthology of hospital-and medical-industry themed writing, essays explore various topical subjects, including health care, the aged, families, doctors, mortality, fatality, and the growing concern for safety, service, and well-being. Featuring contributors from a wide range of connections to medical drama—patients, loved ones, and providers being the most prominent—this collection will appeal to those in the medical profession as well as patients and their family members.

In the anthology’s foreword, Tabatha Southey writes, “These are travelogues to a land we seldom plan on touring, a land we skirt, but that we must visit and which is in fact extraordinary.” Serious, sad, light, funny, and sometimes all of these at once, the wisdom of these stories will find resonance with practitioners, students, and anyone interacting with the healthcare system.

“With Mess, Devaney and Molenhuis have shone a spotlight where many of us still fear to tread, doing patients an enormous service in illuminating their experiences with the potential of changing our healthcare system for the better, and also creating an emotional and most compelling read.”—Kerry Clare, Pickle Me This

“This book is a rare gem of contemporary scholarship…whether patient, family member or professional, whether scholar or member of the general public: Read this book.”–Kathryn Church, Director of Disability Studies at Ryerson University

Julie Devaney is the author of My Leaky Body. She was named one of the Women Health Heroes by Best Health Magazine in 2011, has received national media attention on CBC’s White Coat Black Art’s “Talking Back” episode, and has been profiled in Abilities Magazine, Chatelaine, and The Toronto Star. She lives in Toronto, Ontario.

Dave Molenhuis is a journalist and the national chairperson of the Canadian Federation of Students. He lives in Ottawa, Ontario.

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The Best Canadian Essays 2011


ISBN: 9781926639420
Price: $12.95 – special sale price!
Pub Date: Fall 2011




The third in a series that launched to excitement and acclaim in 2009, Best Canadian Essays 2011 covers an impressive variety of topics. New series editor, Christopher Doda, and guest editor, Ibi Kaslik, infuse the series with a breath of fresh air—selecting insightful and provocative essays from Canadian magazines that range from personal insights on post-partum depression, a pro-smoking diatribe, and an appreciation of the great opera singer Maria Callas to pieces on “wage slavery”, the plight of zoo elephants, Canada’s ongoing war in Afghanistan and much more. The Best Canadian Essays 2011 exemplifies the outstanding quality and stunning diversity of Canadian nonfiction writing today.

About the Guest Editor

Ibi Kaslik is an internationally published novelist, freelance writer, and teachers. Her most recent novel, The Angel Riots, is a rock’n’roll comic-tragedy and was nominated for Ontario’s Trillium award in 2009. Her first novel, Skinny, was a New York Times Bestseller and has been published in numerous countries. A native of Toronto, Ibi teaches creative writing at the University of Toronto’s School of Continuing Studies and works as an art educator for youth.

About the Series Editor

Christopher Doda is an award-winning critic, editor, and poet. He is the author of two collections of poetry, Among Ruins (2001) and Aesthetics Lesson (2007). His poems and reviews have appeared in journals and magazines across Canada and he was an editor at Exile: The Literary Quarterly for five years. He is currently the review editor for the online journal Studio.

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The Best Canadian Poetry in English 2011


ISBN-13: 978126639413
Price: $14.95 special sale!
Pub Date: Fall 2011




The Best Canadian Poetry in English 2011 proudly continues a series that kicked off with a bang in 2008 and thrives under the stewardship of esteemed editor Molly Peacock and a different acclaimed poet guest editor each year. For 2011, Priscila Uppal chose the fifty best Canadian poems published in Canadian online and print literary journals in 2010. With this annual anthology, readers are able to tap into the remarkable and vibrant Canadian poetry scene.

“Tightrope is doing a great service to Canadian poetry by launching this series, and Uppal does a commendable job with this go-around. I will definitely keep my eyes open for subsequent editions in the coming years.” Mark Sampson, Free Range Reading

And no matter the theme, no matter the form, The Best Canadian Poetry In English 2011 urges us to look at our poetry with new eyes, new appreciation for what our nation is writing and, hopefully, publishing.—Lori May, Northern Poetry Review

About the Guest Editor
Priscila Uppal is a poet, novelist, and York University professor. Her publications include Ontological Necessities (shortlisted for the Griffin Poetry Prize), Traumatology, Successful Tragedies (Bloodaxe books, UK), Winter Sport: Poems (written as Canadian Athletes Now poet-in-residence for the Olympic and Paralympic Games) the novels The Divine Economy of Salvation and To Whom It May Concern, and the study We Are What We Mourn: The Contemporary English-Canadian Elegy. Time Out London recently dubbed her “Canada’s coolest poet.” Visit priscilauppal.ca

About the Series Editor
Molly Peacock is the author of six volumes of poetry, including The Second Blush; a memoir, Paradise, Piece by Piece; and a one-woman show in poems, “The Shimmering Verge.” She is a contributing editor of the Literary Review of Canada and a faculty mentor at the Spalding MFA Program. Her latest work of nonfiction is The Paper Garden: Mrs. Delaney Begins Her Life’s Work at 72, which was nominated for BC’s National Award for Canadian Non-Fiction.

 

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Excerpt from Best Canadian Poetry 2008, “Introduction”

Introduction

As I read 2007’s possible contenders – each on several occasions, to increase a poem’s chances of striking me in a receptive moment – what was I looking for? First: good writing. Awkward or rote syntax; familiar expressions, images and locutions; or random lineation, ruled a poem out. A meaningfully rebellions and distinctive syntax or deliberately dissonant music often riled it in. Second: depth and challenge, be that emotional or intellectual. If additional readings failed to yield new insights and appreciations, but rather, dulled the flash I’d sensed the first time around, the poem lost its Post-it note. Finally, and inseparable from the first two criteria: an interesting, even strange, sensibility or imagination. (As an undergrad, I fumed when one of my instructors remarked that my poems failed to startle. I didn’t want to startle; surely the startle factor was overrated. Only later dud I realize that what I did want to do – to please – doomed my poems to mediocrity.) “Startling” need not imply clatter and flash. I sought poems that excited and surprised me, that felt (boldly or quietly) necessary, often urgent. I sought poems serious and poems frivolous (though seriously frivolous). Those poems that played it safe, that failed to follow through on the risks they initiated, or that took risks apparently for their own sake, without integrity to form content, did not make it into the anthology, though some distinguished themselves enough to appear on the long list. I was without doubt a tougher critic than if I’d been reading fewer poems, but asking myself whether I could confidently put my name behind a particular choice forced me to be discerning.


For more information about The Best Canadian Poetry in English 2008 or to purchase the book, please click here.

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Excerpt from Best Canadian Essays 2009, “Introduction”

INTRODUCTION

When Ezra Pound recommended that “poetry should be at least as well-written as prose” he confirmed what every journalist, book reviewer, literary critic, and magazine writer already knew: prose is hard work. It can be as economical, sensuous, and bracing as poetry, but, unlike poetry, prose has specific rules and provides specific guarantees. That’s because prose is what you turn to when you want to say something about something. One really can’t afford to be at a loss for words. It is an information conductor: no matter how stylish your sentences, your syntax must serve up clarity not ambiguity.

Prose is also the freelancer’s medium. Written for payment, prose is a product that, in turn, is sold to consumers who inhabit a marketplace filled with distractions. The writing, therefore, needs to be lively and incisive. It needs to act swiftly on the reader. What’s more, people who write prose are people who hustle after assignments. They tend to have a habit of taking on too much, which means they live a life oppressed by deadlines. There’s no time, therefore, to become self-conscious or rhetorical. When such writers get in trouble, they need solutions that work on the fly. But if they’re good, their instinct for expediency shares space with an appetite for artistry. They try to find new ways to build rhythm into their paragraphs. They try to find new ways to construct crisp, well-shaped sentences. The end result is a kind of belletristic grace: writing that wants us to take pleasure in the experience of reading it, but also has an overwhelming interest in making itself understood. This twofold challenge—to hold the reader’s attention, while giving them news they need—is why prose plays such a vital role in building up a viable public culture.

We looked high and low for essays that displayed this kind of prose, from literary periodicals to web journals to general-interest magazines. We were spoiled for choice. “An essay,” said Ian Hamilton, “can be an extended book review, a piece of reportage, a travelogue, a revamped lecture, an amplified diary-jotting, a refurbished sermon. In other words, an essay can be just about anything it wants to be, anything its author chooses to ‘essay.’ ” Hamilton here reminds us that the term is drawn from the French verb essayer: to try on, attempt, put to the test. No surprise, then, that so many of the essays we found revel in the opportunities the form offers as a vehicle for exploration. No navel-gazing, either. Writers delivered their stories from the front lines of human experience. They addressed themselves directly, and fearlessly, to serious subjects. They worked hard to produce original approaches to important, much-covered topics suffering breezy neglect by a bored media. What this book helps prove is that, along with our talent for short stories, Canadians excel at the essay form. We have a knack for open-mindedness, feel uneasy around oversimplifications, try to square any starkly opposed positions. Growing up somewhere between American gusto and British reserve, we are perhaps well-positioned to make balanced, nuanced, valuable observations. We have a built-in appreciation of diversity and culture. We are also, by nature, generalists: we like to know many things about lots of subjects. All of which gives Canadian prose a three-dimensional credibility.


For more information about The Best Canadian Essays 2009 or to purchase the book, please click here.

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Excerpt from Best Canadian Poems 2009, “Introduction: Canadian Poetry Today”

Introduction: Canadian Poetry Today
The Feeling for Being: Canadian Poetry in a Landscape

Today’s Canadian poetry is an adventure undertaken with brio. Its clarity and surge are evident equally whether its mood is dark or light, its pace meditative or militant. Great human hopes and debates are engaged with an openness that bespeaks humility, but with the confidence that leads an artist to firm outline, to vivid colour and movement. These qualities are evident on every page of The Best Canadian Poetry in English 2009. Let me choose these lines from Dave Margoshes’ poem “Becoming a Writer”:

What could be easier than learning to write?
Novels, poems, fables with and without morals,
they’re all within you, in the heart, the head,
the bowel, the tip of the pen a diviner’s rod.
Reach inside and there they are…


For more information about The Best Canadian Poetry in English 2009 or to purchase the book, please click here.

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Excerpt from I.V. Lounge Nights, “The End of the World”

The End of The World

The persistent cough, the routine procedure,
the congenital defect, the faulty wiring,
the fire in the starboard engine, the force majeure,
the mistress in the city, the last spirited thrust,
the little breeze off the coast of Africa,
the apples torn from the trees,
the unopened mail, the paperboy ringing the bell,
the atmospheric anomaly, the snow on the TV,
the hot wind with its tincture of rotten fish,
the wasps-nest of tumors, the drug-resistant strain,
the feeding tube, the shunt, the morphine drip,
the fatigue and general malaise,
the night inventory of the medicine cabinet,
the sleeping pills, the razor blades,
the reversals suffered as a child,
the bend in the road, the patch of black ice,
the telephone pole advancing in the high beams,
the statistical improbability, the cougar attack,
the stray piece of cosmic debris, the locals celebrating
the wedding of the loveliest girl in the village
by firing their guns into the air.


For more information about I.V. Lounge Nights or to purchase the book, please click here.

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Excerpt from She’s Shameless, “Introduction: This Is Not An After School Special”

Introduction: This is Not an After-School Special
Stacey May Fowles and Megan Griffith-Greene

“There are things in my life I regret, things I hope I can fix, things I still hope to accomplish, but I believe that shame is worthless. Let other people hold those scales. I have my hands full.”
-Amy Saxon Bosworth, I Don’t Wear Cloaks

This is not an after-school special. The pages of this book do not contain cautionary tales about the dangers of peer pressure, how doing drugs will ruin your life, how you should save yourself until marriage, and how you should stay in school.

In fact, it’s always really bothered us the way that people talk about, and to, youth. The world never gives young people all that much credit—teens are too young to make their own decisions; they are apathetic and shallow, reckless and thoughtless. That sort of thinking is a caricature: stupid, offensive, and, more often than not, hypocritical.

So we set out to create an anthology to combat that condescension, where women told the truth about their lives as teenagers—no bullshit.


For more information about She’s Shameless or to purchase, please click here.

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Excerpt from GULCH, “Poemagogy”

Poemagogy ::::: Adebe D.A.

Traffic sweat drips
flashing whiz children with red lips
neon age, yellow hallways
no decor
just wind: the age of reason.

I tried to reason with a lamppost
whatcha burning for? so many dead stars
like you dizzying up the streets, hardly any room
unlike a galaxy

but it wasn’t really a lamppost
and I wasn’t reasoning;

it was the simple act of pressing
palm to palm to
grape white saintliness,
the point at which a light
is formed and carries you forever

when it does not take off
with the wind
but remains like a question

the psychodynamic arc
of city life, trapping and liberation
Parlafilms:

where we speak as though
destroyed, where we only desire
to become something new.

Constant toil in the life of art!
the assemblage
slaveships deathtrains clubs
Eeenough
our reality (swallow)
too much, these bells
summon what enabled us to clash

first into the night
like palms
when we are strong
with the
not yet,
with the beauty of now

when we lift high
the banner of reason
to run across lines of flight,
of light, singing
how every life shall be a song
or certainly some sense of mattering

of being indivisible – that is the only desire
there is, to be enabled with passing
words that foam
like seas deep with dark

to reducible neither to the One
nor the multiple,
to become not you
or two, three four five
nor to add you to myself

for we have all
always been in motion:
our dimension is the same,
lovers are
just interlocutors in general,
radical disturbances

like subway trains, a kiss, a missed stop:
the shock of the encounter
when beauty exceeds
the limits of the rational

the unscripted sublimity
of the earth, this place
we inhabit on loan.

The dead poets keep telling me
anonymity is a lie, this city just another point
of departure

that desire is just sympathy, not filiation; that we are angels,
alloys, the wind

that our roots are rhizomes,
our lives creatio ex amore,
multiplicity is what has borne the city
is what has borne us, we are still being
birthed again, and up, and away.


For more information about GULCH or to purchase the book, please click here.

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Exerpt from “Haunted: An Introduction”, found in In the Dark

Sitting down in your favourite armchair to read this book, you’ll hear the soft swish as you meander from story to story and you’ll think to yourself that the sound of paged turning is soothing. But that’s not the whisper of paper you hear, it’s something else.

Don’t you know? Ghosts haunt books more than any place else: the ghosts of past readers and borrowers, the ghosts of protagonists and antagonists. Ephemeral words have their own ghosts, spirits descending on the arcing trajectory of metamorphed ancient languages. There is no more spook- ridden activity than the reading of books.

And ghosts love books about ghosts more than anything else, for ghosts, if nothing else, are more self-absorbed than the living. So before you sit down quietly at 2:00a.m. ti read this book (for when you read a book of ghost stories, it is always 2:00 a.m.), there are some things I must tell you. Some things to warn you about…


For more information about In the Dark: Stories from the Supernatural or to purchase the book, please click here.

 

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The Best Canadian Poetry 2010

ISBN: 9781926639161
Price: $14.95 special sale!
Pub Date: Fall 2010




The outstanding success of The Best Canadian Poetry in English series continues in 2010 with guest editor Lorna Crozier. The Best Canadian Poetry in English 2010 proudly continues a series that kicked off with a bang in 2008 under the stewardship of esteemed series editor, Molly Peacock, and inaugural guest editor, award-winning poet Stephanie Bolster. The 2009 edition was expertly curated by A.F. Moritz, winner of the 2009 Griffin Poetry Prize. And for 2010, Lorna Crozier has chosen the fifty best Canadian poems published in Canadian literary journals and magazines in the preceding  year. With this anthology, readers—often baffled by proliferating poems and poets—will be able to tap into the remarkable and vibrant Canadian poetry scene, checking out the currents—and cross currents—of poetry in a volume distilled by a round robin of distinguished editorial taste.

Click to read an excerpt from The Best Canadian Poetry in English, 2010.

“A satisfying amuse-bouche sampling of some of Canada’s most active and celebrated contemporary poets… I enjoyed this collection immensely.”—Rhonda Douglas, Arc Poetry Magazine

“Some of us can only afford a half a dozen or so subscriptions to literary magazines, so the publication of The Best Canadian Poetry in English, now in its third year, is a welcome event.”—Maxianne Berger, Rover Arts

Lorna Crozier has received numerous awards for her fourteen books of poetry, including the Governor-General’s Award-winning Inventing the Hawk. She has also edited anthologies, among them Desire in Seven Voices and, with Patrick Lane, Addicted: Notes from the Belly of the Beast and two anthologies of new Canadian poets, Breathing Fire 1 and 2. Her most recent book is Small Beneath the Sky: A Prairie Memoir. She has read her work in every continent except Antartica and last year a collection of her poems translated into Spanish was published in Mexico City. She lives in Saanich, BC, and teaches and serves as Chair in the Writing Department at the University of Victoria.

Molly Peacock is the author of six volumes of poetry, including The Second Blush (McClelland & Stewart, 2009), Cornucopia: New & Selected Poems (W.W. Norton) a memoir Paradise, Piece by Piece, and a one-woman show in poems, “The Shimmering Verge” produced by Louise Fagan Productions (London, Ontario). She has been series editor of The Best Canadian Poetry in English since 2007, as well as a contributing editor of the Literary Review of Canada and a faculty mentor at the Spalding MFA Program. Her poetry, published in leading literary journals in North America and the UK, is widely anthologized. Her latest work of nonfiction is The Paper Garden: Mrs. Delany Begins Her Life’s Work at 72 (McClelland & Stewart, 2010).

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GULCH | Ed. Sarah Beaudin, Karen C. Da Silva, & Curran Folkers

DOWN WITH ARBOREAL THOUGHT! // A Steel Bananas Project

GULCH, edited by Karen C. Da Silva, Curran Folkers & Sarah BeaudinISBN-10: 1926639073
ISBN-13: 9781926639079
Price: $18.95
Pub Date: Fall 2009

“From its opening statement, ‘This Book Is a Rhizome,’ to Adebe D.A.’s ‘Poemagogy,’ to John Unrau’s ‘New Age Muskie Considers a Change of Lifestyle,’ Gulch privileges the rhetoric of (and itself exists as an example of) that ever-regenerative genre, the manifesto.”
— Andrew Dubois, University of Toronto Quarterly 80.2

“…the reliability of GULCH is the space it provides for new visions, new styles and new writers.”
Rabble Magazine

“Gulch plays with the idea of collaboration and does it well, with a buffet of new and exciting work from today’s up and coming talent.”
Broken Pencil Magazine

Inspired by the theories of Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari, GULCH: An Assemblage of Poetry and Prose is a rhizomatic exploration of the modern Canadian literary community.

Drawing on the postmodern themes of detachment and disjuncture, GULCH seeks to create an optimistic snapshot of the pluralities and complexities that constitute the post-pomo literary landscape. Focusing on the theme of fragmentation, Steel Bananas members Sarah Beaudin, Karen Correia Da Silva and Curran Folkers have collected pieces from community artists, Professors, lit students, burgeoning young talent as well as established writers in order to compile a collection that resists the notion of wholeness, privileging instead the multiplicity and diversity found in contemporary globalized culture. This assemblage of poetry and prose bares the innovation and cultural critique of post-millennium Canadian writers, and seeks to expose the beauty of discontinuity.

Featuring work from Adebe D.A., Stephen Cain, Ewan Whyte, Spencer Gordon, Chris Felling, Matthew Hall, Daniel Tysdal, Chris Eaton & Virtual Collaborators, Amanda Lee, JJ Steinfeld, Emma Healy, Wally Keeler, Jon Eskedjian, Vincent De Freitas, Craig Alexander, Heather Babcock, Richard Rosenbaum, Jerry Levy, Alex Consiglio, Sarah Beaudin, Ursula Pflug, Kathleen Brown, Matthew Moliterni, Darryl Salach, Shannon Robinson, Miles Henry, Shannon Webb Campbell, John Unrau, Nathaniel G Moore, Zack Kotzer, Firdaus Bilimoria, Jimmy McInnes, Steph Tracey, James Arthur, Melanie Janisse, Corrigan Hammond, N Dana Jerabek, Shannon Maguire, Ryan Tannenbaum, Karen Correia Da Silva, James Papoutsis, Christopher Olsen, Alyksandra Ackerman, Curran Folkers, James Hatch, John C Goodman, Andrew McEwan, John Nyman, Mark Reble, Jamie Ross, Devon Wong, N Alexander Armstrong.

Click to read an excerpt from GULCH.

Curran Folkers, Karen Correia Da Silva, and Sarah Beaudin of Steel Bananas

Steel Bananas is a not-for-profit art collective and culture zine. They publish a rag-bag of contemporary Canadian writers and art-bums on the 15th of each month, aiming to critically and playfully explore contemporary cultural theory and the varying facets of contemporary urban culture. They’re proud to augment all virtual content with print media or in-the-flesh art happenings around Toronto, and to support independent, alternative, and marginal art in Canada.

http://www.steelbananas.com

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She’s Shameless

She's Shameless, edited by Stacey May Fowles and Megan Griffith-Greene
ISBN13: 9780978335199
Price: $12.95 – special sale price!
Pub Date: 2009




Co-editors Megan Griffith-Greene and Stacey May Fowles have compiled an anthology of fearless and funny non-fiction about strong, smart and shameless young women.

With wit and honesty, the writers share stories of their teen experiences (both positive and negative) on everything from pop culture to high school principals.

The book is founded on Shameless magazine’s tradition of smart, sassy, honest and inclusive writing that reaches out to young female readers who are often ignored by mainstream: freethinkers, queer youth, young women of colour, punk rockers, feminists, intellectuals, artists and activists.

Click to read an excerpt from She’s Shameless.

Featuring work from Nicole Cohen, Melinda Mattos, Stacey May Fowles, Megan Griffith-Greene, Amy Saxon Bosworth, Shannon Webb-Campbell, Nicole Pasulka, Adrienne Mercer, Jowita Bydlowska, Teri Vlassopoulos, Shannon Gerard, K Bannerman, Jessica McGann, Shaunga Tagore, Karma Waltonen, Denise Reich, Dianah Smith, Catherine Graham, Pam Park, Maggie Dort, Julia Serano, BJ MacBain, Jessica Lockhart, Cora Goss-Grubbs, Sarah Pinder, Tara-Michelle Ziniuk, Emily Pohl-Weary, Zoe Whittall, Suzy Malik, and Lynn Bartels.

Editors’ Bios:
Stacey May Fowles is a writer and McGill Graduate in English Literature and Women’s Studies who has worked in the literary and gallery communities of Montreal, Toronto and Vancouver. Her first novel Be Good (Tightrope Books) came out in 2007, her second book Fear of Fighting (Invisible Publishing) was launched in 2008. Her written work has been published in various digital and literary publications, including Fireweed, The Absinthe Literary Review, Kiss Machine, sub-TERRAIN, Lickety Split and Hive Magazine. Her non-fiction piece “Friction Burn” appeared in the widely acclaimed anthology Nobody Passes: Rejecting the Rules of Gender and Conformity (ed. Matt Bernstein Sycamore, Seal Press). Her work is also in the anthology Transits: Stories from In-Between (Invisible Publishing) and Cahoots Magazine. She is the publisher of Shameless magazine.

Megan Griffith-Greene’s experience in activism, arts and journalism started when she was a very shameless teen growing up in Toronto. Now, she is the editor of Shameless magazine, a feminist magazine for teens and young women, and a contributing editor of Chatelaine. She is also a founding editor and designer of The New Pollution new music review, a web-based magazine and pod-cast on indie music. Her writing has appeared in THIS magazine, The Walrus and Chatelaine.

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The Best Canadian Poetry 2009

Best Canadian Poetry in English 2009
ISBN: 9781926639031
Price: $14.95 special sale price!
Pub Date: Fall 2009




From a long list drawn from Canadian literary journals and magazines, award-winning poet A.F. Moritz, the volume’s guest editor, has chosen 50 of the best Canadian poems published in 2008. With this anthology, readers, often baffled by proliferating poems and poets, will be able to tap into the remarkable and vibrant Canadian poetry scene, checking out the currents—and cross currents—of poetry in a volume distilled by a round robin of distinguished editorial taste.

“The collection is a unique glimpse at a diversity of poets, from Ottawa’s David O’Meara to Margaret Atwood to the revered P.K. Page.”—Cormac Rae, Ottawa Xpress

Featuring work from Margaret Atwood, Margaret Avison, Ken Babstock, Shirley Bear, Tim Bowling, Asa Boxer, Anne Compton, Jan Conn, Lorna Crozier, Barry Dempster, Don Domanski, John Donlan, Tyler Enfield, Jesse Ferguson, Connie Fife, Adam Getty, Steven Heighton, Michael Johnson, Sonnet L’Abbe, Anita Lahey, M Travis Lane, Evelyn Lau, Richard Lemm, Dave Margoshes, Don McKay, Eric Miller, Shane Neilson, Peter Norman, David O’Meara, PK Page, Elise Partridge, Elizabeth Philips, Meredith Quartermain, Matt Rader, John Reibetanz, Robyn Sarah, Peter Dale Scott, Cora Sire, Karen Solie, Carmine Starnino, John Steffler, Ricardo Sternberg, John Terpstra, Sharon Thesen, Matthew Tierney, Patrick Warner, Tom Wayman, Patricia Young, Changming Yuan, and Jan Zwicky.

Click to read an excerpt from The Best Canadian Poetry in English 2009.

A native of Niles, Ohio, A.F. Moritz has lived in Toronto since graduating from Marquette University in Milwaukee in 1974. He teaches literature and creative writing at the University of Toronto. His poetry has received the Award in Literature of the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters, as well as Canada Council, Guggenheim Foundation and Ingram Merrill Foundation fellowships. He has translated books by Ludwig Zeller including In the Country of the Antipodes: Selected Poems 1964 – 1979 and The Ghost’s Tattoos.

Molly Peacock is the author of five volumes of poetry, including Cornucopia: New & Selected Poems, published by Penguin Canada, and by W.W. Norton in the US and UK. She is the Poetry Editor of the Literary Review of Canada. Before she emigrated to Canada in1992, she was one of the creators of Poetry in Motion on the Buses and Subways in New York City, and she served as an early advisor to Poetry On The Way. Peacock is also the author of a memoir, Paradise, Piece by Piece, published by McClelland and Stewart, and of a book about poetry, How To Read A Poem & Start A Poetry Circle, also published by M & S. Her reviews and essays have appeared in the Globe and Mail. Her poems have appeared in The New Yorker, The Paris Review, and the TLS. Recently she toured with her one-woman show in poems, The Shimmering Verge produced by the London, Ontario based company, Femme Fatale Productions. She lives in Toronto with her husband, Michael Groden, an English Professor at the University of Western Ontario. Her website is: mollypeacock.org.

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The Best Canadian Essays 2009

The Best Canadian Essays 2009
ISBN-13: 9781926639055
Price: $13.95-special sale price
Pub Date: 2009




Compiled from dozens of Canadian magazines by two award winning authors, this collection of essays covers a diverse range of topics by Canadian writers. By turns these essays move and excite the reader and help shape Canadian cultural consciousness.

Featuring work from Alex Boyd, Carmine Starnino, Kalam Al-solaylee, Katherine Ashenburg, Kris Demeanor, Jessa Gamble, Nicholas Hune-Brown, Chris Kontges, Anita Lahey, Alison Lee, Nick Mount, Denis Seguin, Chris Turner, Lori Theresa Waller, Nathan Whitlock, and Chris Wood.

Click to read an excerpt from The Best Canadian Essays 2009.

Carmine Starnino has published four books of poetry, the most recent of which is This Way Out (Gaspereau Press) nominated for the 2009 Governor General’s Award for Poetry. His poems have won the F.G. Bressani Literary Prize, the A.M. Klein Prize for Poetry and the Canadian Authors Association Poetry Award. He the author of A Lover’s Quarrel, a collection of essays on Canadian poetry, and the editor of The New Canon: An Anthology of Canadian Poetry. A new collection of his poetry criticism is forthcoming from Biblioasis in 2011. He lives in Montreal, where he edits Maisonneuve magazine.

Alex Boyd is the author of poems, fiction, reviews and essays and has work published in magazines and newspapers such as Taddle Creek, dig, Books in Canada, The Globe and Mail, Quill & Quire and on various sites such as the late Danforth Review. He was the host of the IV Lounge Reading Series from 2003 to 2008 when the series closed its doors. He’s co-editor of the online journal Northern Poetry Review, and his first book of poems Making Bones Walk was published in 2007 by Luna press, winning the Gerald Lampert Award.

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The Best Canadian Poetry 2008

The Best Canadian Poetry in English 2008
ISBN: 9780978335175
Pub Date: 2008

From a long list of one hundred poems drawn from Canadian literary journals magazines, this year’s guest editor, award winning poet Stephanie Bolster, has chosen fifty of the best Canadian poems published in 2007. With this anthology readers, baffled by proliferating poems and poets, can for the first time tap into the remarkable and vibrant Canadian poetry scene. Readers are invited to explore the currents and cross-currents of poetry in a distinguished volume distilled by a round robin of esteemed editorial taste.

Featuring work from Maleea Acker, James Arthur, Leanne Averbach, Margaret Avison, Ken Babstock, John Wall Barger, Brian Bartlett, John Barton, Yvonne Blomer, Tim Bowling, Heather Cadsby, Anne Compton, Kevin Connolly, Meira Cook, Dani Couture, Sadiqa de Meijer, Barry Dempster, Jeramy Dodds, Jeffery Donaldson, Susan Elmslie, Jason Guriel, Aurian Haller, Jason Heroux, Iain Higgins, Bill Howell, Helen Humphreys, Amanda Lamarche, Tim Lilburn, Michael Lista, Keith Maillard, Don McKay, AF Moritz, Jim Nason, Peter Norman, Alison Pick, E Alex Pierce, Craig Poile, Matt Rader, Michael Eden Reynolds, Shane Rhodes, Joy Russell, Heather Sellers, David Seymour, J Mark Smith, Adam Sol, Carmine Starnino, Anna Swanson, Todd Swift, JR Toriseva, and Leif E Vaage.

Click to read an excerpt from The Best Canadian Poetry in English 2008.

Molly Peacock is the author of five volumes of poetry, including Cornucopia: New & Selected Poems. She is the Poetry Editor of the Literary Review of Canada. Before she emigrated to Canada in1992, she was one of the creators of Poetry in Motion in New York City, and she served as an early advisor to Poetry On The Way. Her reviews and essays have appeared in the Globe and Mail, and her poems have appeared in The New Yorker, The Paris Review, and the TLS. She lives in Toronto.

Stephanie Bolster’s first book, White Stone: The Alice Poems, won the Governor General’s Award and the Gerald Lampert Award in 1998. She has also published Two Bowls of Milk, which won the Archibald Lampman Award and was shortlisted for the Trillium Award. Her work has appeared in literary journals internationally and has also garnered her the Bronwen Wallace Award, the Norma Epstein Award, and The Malahat Review’s Long Poem Prize. Her several chapbooks include, most recently, Biodme and Past the Roman Arena. Raised in Burnaby, B.C., she now lives in Montreal, where she teaches in the creative writing programme at Concordia University.

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