Monster | David Livingstone Clink

Monster, by David Livingstone ClinkISBN-13: 978-1-926639-18-5
Price: $5.00 sale price!
Pub Date: Fall 2010




Monster is a poetry collection that Pandora would want to open, containing poems that Eve would bite into.

In a sophomore collection that is bound to cause a stir, David Livingstone Clink takes you on a journey into the belly of the beast, a journey that is both dark and surreal, strange and unusual, a departure from the safe neighbourhoods where people don’t lock their doors at night. But all is not dark! There are the unusual and surreal places that bend your mind, that make you look at things you thought you knew but in a different light, and there is humour. But there is also elder abuse, infidelity, molestation, murder, suicide, serial killers and shapeshifters, six-legged dogs and bodies hanging from barn rafters, spiderwebs and fallen cities, steampunk airships muscling into the night, and always the shadows helping us define our shape, how we feel, and, ultimately, who we are.

Click to read an excerpt from Monster.

Praise for Eating Fruit Out of Season

“When I picked up Eating Fruit out of Season, Clink’s first full-length poetry collection, I expected mostly to laugh and be amused. Instead, I felt nearly the entire spectrum of human emotion. Clink writes with an earnest necessity I didn’t know was in him.”—Jacob Scheier, Prairie Fire

“Clink’s debut suggests the possibility of a less isolated and obscure voice for the contemporary poet.”
—Maurice Mierau, Winnipeg Free Press

“Nowhere in Canadian poetry will the prosaic mind discover verse so barbed and ironic as in this text, while inspired intellects must find it a source of prophetic nostalgia and exquisite, fleshed-out wisdom. Herein is Ontario pastoral and Space-Age romanticism, both scrutinized by a poet who inks truth that is satire.”—George Elliott Clarke, author of Whylah Falls

“I found reading Eating Fruit out of Season to be like, well, like eating fruit out of season—unpredictable, intriguing, not every bite to my taste, but I didn’t want to stop eating.”—Maureen Scott Harris

David Livingstone Clink’s poetry has appeared in The Antigonish Review, CV2, The Dalhousie Review, The Fiddlehead, Grain, Literary Review of Canada, The Prairie Journal, and in ten anthologies, including I.V. Lounge Nights, Garden Variety, Imagination in Action, and the forthcoming Tesseracts XIV (fall 2010). He edited the poetry anthology, A Verdant Green. His first book of poetry was Eating Fruit Out of Season. He lives in Toronto.

Posted in Fall 2010, Halloween Sale, M, Poetry, poetrysale, special holiday sale | Tagged , , , |

The Mourner’s Book of Albums | Daniel Scott Tysdal

ISBN-13: 978-1-926639-20-8
Special Sale Price: $11.95
Pub Date: Fall 2010

Longlisted for the 2011 ReLit Award




An unconventional and profound mixed-media poetry collection that blends traditional and avant garde forms to explore remembrance, grief, and mourning. Daniel Scott Tysdal follows up his first award-winning collection of poetry with The Mourner’s Book of Albums, an emotionally striking and formally ambitious exploration of the elegiac tradition and the twenty-first-century attitude to remembrance and grief. Encountering a wide range of arresting events—from a best friend’s suicide to the war in Afghanistan, from improvised memorials to the plastinated corpses of Body Worlds—these innovative poems survey the forces and forms that shape what and how we mourn. The sonically lively lines, the vivid images, and the richly textured voices of the The Mourner’s Book of Albums are composed in a variety of traditional and unconventional forms—the lyric, the ballad, the graphic poem, and the fabricated document, to name a few—as a means of grappling with the many acts and practices that link the living and the dead. Tysdal compiles the albums, however fluid and fragile, that hold them together.

Click to read an excerpt from The Mourner’s Book of Albums.

Praise for Predicting the Next Big Advertising Breakthrough Using a Potentially Dangerous Method:

“Daniel Scott Tysdal’s poetry is an exhilarating mix of pop culture, philosophy, mythology, and visual art. Here is a poet who possesses the rare combination of experimental instinct and communicative acuity. Read this book for its confident virtuosity, its innovative spirit, and its surprising generosity.”—Jon Paul Fiorentino

“Tysdal recognizes and deconstructs—playfully—the patented absurdity of conventional language. He employs academic, literary, and pop cultural terms, references, discourses, and images to underscore the implicit argument here that standard semantic structures—rhetorics—obscure truth and, thus, Justice. Yet, for all their high-minded, critical jouissance, the lyrics are lively with accessible puns, jokes, games, and satire.”—George Elliot Clarke, author of Whylah Falls

“Tysdal at his best creates a complex, multidimensional, and often contradictory layering of thought and feeling; this tremendously rich, inventive, and energetic book is a most auspicious debut.”—Malcolm Woodland, “Letters in Canada 2006: Poetry,” University of Toronto Quarterly

Daniel Scott Tysdal is the author of Predicting the Next Big Advertising Breakthrough Using a Potentially Dangerous Method (Coteau 2006), which received the ReLit Award for Poetry (2007) and the Anne Szumigalski Poetry Award (2006). His work has appeared in a number of Canadian literary journals and has earned him both an honourable mention at the 2003 National Magazine Awards and a place in the finals of the CBC’s 2005 National Poetry Face-Off. He teaches creative writing and English literature at the University of Toronto, Scarborough.

Posted in Award Nominees & Winners, Fall 2010, Halloween Sale, M, Poetry, special holiday sale | Tagged , , , , |

The Best Canadian Poetry 2010

ISBN: 9781926639161
Price: $14.95 special sale!
Pub Date: Fall 2010




The outstanding success of The Best Canadian Poetry in English series continues in 2010 with guest editor Lorna Crozier. The Best Canadian Poetry in English 2010 proudly continues a series that kicked off with a bang in 2008 under the stewardship of esteemed series editor, Molly Peacock, and inaugural guest editor, award-winning poet Stephanie Bolster. The 2009 edition was expertly curated by A.F. Moritz, winner of the 2009 Griffin Poetry Prize. And for 2010, Lorna Crozier has chosen the fifty best Canadian poems published in Canadian literary journals and magazines in the preceding  year. With this anthology, readers—often baffled by proliferating poems and poets—will be able to tap into the remarkable and vibrant Canadian poetry scene, checking out the currents—and cross currents—of poetry in a volume distilled by a round robin of distinguished editorial taste.

Click to read an excerpt from The Best Canadian Poetry in English, 2010.

“A satisfying amuse-bouche sampling of some of Canada’s most active and celebrated contemporary poets… I enjoyed this collection immensely.”—Rhonda Douglas, Arc Poetry Magazine

“Some of us can only afford a half a dozen or so subscriptions to literary magazines, so the publication of The Best Canadian Poetry in English, now in its third year, is a welcome event.”—Maxianne Berger, Rover Arts

Lorna Crozier has received numerous awards for her fourteen books of poetry, including the Governor-General’s Award-winning Inventing the Hawk. She has also edited anthologies, among them Desire in Seven Voices and, with Patrick Lane, Addicted: Notes from the Belly of the Beast and two anthologies of new Canadian poets, Breathing Fire 1 and 2. Her most recent book is Small Beneath the Sky: A Prairie Memoir. She has read her work in every continent except Antartica and last year a collection of her poems translated into Spanish was published in Mexico City. She lives in Saanich, BC, and teaches and serves as Chair in the Writing Department at the University of Victoria.

Molly Peacock is the author of six volumes of poetry, including The Second Blush (McClelland & Stewart, 2009), Cornucopia: New & Selected Poems (W.W. Norton) a memoir Paradise, Piece by Piece, and a one-woman show in poems, “The Shimmering Verge” produced by Louise Fagan Productions (London, Ontario). She has been series editor of The Best Canadian Poetry in English since 2007, as well as a contributing editor of the Literary Review of Canada and a faculty mentor at the Spalding MFA Program. Her poetry, published in leading literary journals in North America and the UK, is widely anthologized. Her latest work of nonfiction is The Paper Garden: Mrs. Delany Begins Her Life’s Work at 72 (McClelland & Stewart, 2010).

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The Nights Also | Anna Swanson

The Nights Also, by Anna SwansonISBN13: 9781926639130
Price: $14.95
Winner of the LAMBDA award and the Gerald Lampert Award!




Fearless and insightful poems that illuminate one woman’s experience of chronic illness, relationships and gender identity, and solitude.

Anna Swanson’s poetry leads you through a life that tries to deal with a misunderstood illness, a gradual acceptance of one’s sexuality, and a sometimes onerous relationship with nature. Her writing is as honest as it is complex, and it attempts to reconcile an identity that has been distorted by illness through a profound analysis of memory and individual meaning. With poems that run the gamut from fearful to the absurd, that are at once deep and pithy, Anna Swanson proves in The Nights Also that she is a brave new voice in Canadian poetry.

Click to read an excerpt from The Nights Also.

Anna Swanson studied creative writing at the University of Victoria and the Memorial University of Newfoundland. Her poetry has appeared in PRISM International, The Antigonish Review, The Best Canadian Poetry in English 2008, and numerous other literary journals. She has paid the rent by planning festivals, selling books, serving drinks, making maps, walking on stilts, bowling with teenagers, writing press releases, and watching for forest fires. She now lives in St John’s NL and works as a librarian.

Praise for The Nights Also

“There are the nights, yes, but in this startling debut collection ‘each day is a / thin steel catwalk of light’ and ‘the sun makes its arc across the mouth’ . . . Each word and image is freshly forged. The poems are smart, original, and daring, the footwork so assured that Anna Swanson dances with the future with no missteps. This is a strong new voice that reaffirms my faith in the heartbeat and vision that poetry can give us.”—Lorna Crozier

“As meditations on illness, these are extraordinary—sad, undermining, and, sometimes, spiked with a sense of humour.”—Tim Lilburn

“‘Oh dear body,’ Anna Swanson writes in her impressive debut collection, ‘How did we get here?’ How indeed? Throughout The Nights Also, Swanson asks: What does it mean to be frail and human. What is illness? Health? Gender? Memory? Love? And though Swanson doesn’t (thank God) arrive at any definitive answers, her skill and delight in exploring life’s mysteries and complexities are palpable. These poems—intelligent, passionate, and beautifully executed—announce the arrival of a gifted poet, one I hope we’ll be hearing from for years to come.’Patricia Young

“Swanson’s narratives are sympathetic and her gestures towards self-advocacy are inspiring. Her speaker is highly personable, with straight-forward language. Having executed the realm of the autobiographically-oriented first collection with panache, I am eager to see what she will take up in subsequent work.”—Angela Hibbs, Broken Pencil

“Swanson’s style and voice are light, inviting, and warm, comfortably drawing the reader in to this nervous, unsettling world.” Heather Holditch, Toronto Word on the Street

Posted in 2015 sale, Award Nominees & Winners, Catalogue, lammygoldie, N, Poetry, Spring 2010 | Tagged , , , , , , |

The Grammar of Distance | Ian Burgham

The Grammar of Distance, by Ian BurghamISBN-13: 978-1-926639-09-3
ISBN-10: 1-926639-09-X
Price: $21.95
Pub Date: Spring 2010

Ian Burgham once again presents poems of compassion that celebrate all manner of the heartland’s hazards and risks.

In his third collection of poetry, The Grammar of Distance, Ian Burgham writes from his gut and his heart. His imagery is, by turns, sensuous and rough-hewn, soft and hard. The poems crackle with sonic energy; they whinny and stamp. They whistle in the dark. His poetic landscapes frequent the windswept coasts of Scotland; but in this collection, we also find him doing terribly Canadian things like snowshoeing, surveying, chopping wood. Sometimes Al Purdy can be heard in Burgham’s voice and, occasionally, Patrick Lane. His penchant for storytelling and Celtic elegiac moods makes him a solid candidate for the position of poetic counterpart to Alistair MacLeod. Like all strong poets, Burgham’s imagination breaks past borders. Tribal and intense, his poems are conversations with loved ones, lost ones, and all the poets with storms in their bones. They are feisty. They rant. They grieve. They celebrate. Burgham is a thinker, a philosophical poet, a restless soul who asks big questions.

Click to read an excerpt from The Grammar of Distance.

Ian Burgham is an associate of the League of Canadian Poets. Born in New Zealand, raised in Canada, he has lived and worked for extended periods of time in both New Zealand and Scotland. He studied literature at Queen’s University and at the University of Edinburgh. He worked as an editor for Canongate Publishing and later became publisher of Macdonald Publishing in Edinburgh. He has previously published two collections of poetry, A Confession of Birds, a chapbook published in the UK in 2004, and The Stone Skippers, published in 2007 by Tightrope Books and nominated for the 2008 Relit Award. He currently divides his time between Toronto and Kingston. In 2004-5 Burgham won the Queen’s University “Well-Versed” Poetry Award. His work has been published in many Canadian literary journals including Prairie Fire, Contemporary Verse 2 (CV2), The New Quarterly, The Literary Review of Canada, Queen’s Quarterly, dANDelion, Harpweaver, Precipice, Jones Avenue, and Ascent Aspirations.

Praise for The Stone Skippers:

“… a voice you don’t want to miss.” —Di Brandt

“ … concision, leanness and directness …”—A.F. Moritz

“rare and remarkable … the work of one who has the ear for the possibilities of language …”—Alexander McCall Smith

Ian’s poetry has also been integrated into jewelery by artist Jeanine Payer. View the beautiful creations on Jeanine’s website: www.jeaninepayer.com

Posted in Catalogue, G, Poetry, Spring 2010 | Tagged , , , |

The Days You’ve Spent | Suzanne Bowness

The Days You've SpentISBN: 978-1-926639109
Price: $5
Pub Date: 2010




Poems that reflect the individual’s experience in the urban jungle, combining observation and insight that every city dweller will recognize. The city, at once benevolent and indifferent to its residents, is the inspiration for this debut collection of poetry by Suzanne Bowness. In the first poem, a young woman arrives in the big city, where “in the beginning, anonymity is everywhere,” and wonders what her life there will bring. Using this new arrival as her starting point, Bowness moves on to develop urban themes of anonymity and collectivity alongside individualist themes of freedom, loneliness, and growing self identity. Part private reflection, part love letter to the metropolis, The Days You’ve Spent pulls back the curtain on city life, finding beauty in neon signs and profundity in laundromats. In these poems, the individual and the city interweave, and urban immersion becomes an essential element in personal growth.

“What a joy to spend days with The Days You’ve Spent by Sue Bowness. Excellence is her standard, structure and musicality her method, narrative spiced with whimsy her mode. Even while wondering its worth getting out of bed to face the day, Bowness flourishes imagery flooded with light. Here are poems that intrigue, provoke, entwine, and always shine.”—Molly Peacock, author of The Second Blush

“She [Sue Bowness] is a bard of whimsical domesticity, very much like Molly Peacock, whose endorsement graces the back cover.”—George Elliot Clarke, The Chronicle-Herald

Suzanne (Sue) Bowness is a writer and editor whose poems have appeared in the Literary Review of Canada and Pagitica. Her play The Reading Circle won first place in the 2006 Ottawa Little-Theatre One-Act Playwriting Competition. She has a PhD in English from the University of Ottawa.

Posted in Catalogue, D, Poetry, poetrysale, special holiday sale, Spring 2010 | Tagged , , , , , |

Somewhere to Run From | Tara-Michelle Ziniuk

Somewhere to Run From, by Tara-Michelle ZiniukISBN: 9780978335182
Price: $5—special sale!
Pub Date: 2009

Longlisted for the 2010 ReLit Award




Tara-Michelle Ziniuk’s second collection of poetry is dangerously sarcastic, Toronto-local, bitter, sweet, and bruising in its honesty. Challenging the notions of what a girl runs from, both literally and figuratively, Somewhere to Run From takes on complex settings from which to depart: poverty, pop and sub-culture, madness and normative sexuality among these locations.

“Tara-Michelle Ziniuk produces another undeniably readable, attractive little book of spare, plainspoken poetry… chock full of sarcasm, cleverly slurred confessions, and the broken-bottle-sharp perceptions of a hurt, vulnerable narrator.” Spencer Gordon, Broken Pencil

“A wonderful example of the range of contradictory thoughts and feelings Ziniuk’s Somewhere to Run From will inspire”—goodreads.com

Click to read an excerpt from Somewhere to Run From.

Tara-Michelle Ziniuk is a Montreal-born, Toronto-based author, performer and activist with an extensive background in community radio. She has been published in magazines and anthologies across North America and is a regular contributor to NOW, Broken Pencil Magazine, and Herizons as well as writing for This, $pread, HOUR and others. Her first book, Emergency Contact, was released with McGilligan Books in 2006 to wide critical acclaim and was taught through the English Department at York University.

Posted in Award Nominees & Winners, Catalogue, Poetry, poetrysale, Pride Sale, S, special holiday sale, spring 2009 | Tagged , , , , |

Bone Dream-Moira MacDougall

Bone Dream, by Moira MacDougall
ISBN: 9781926639000
Price: $10—special sale price!
Pub Date: Spring 2009

Longlisted for the 2010 ReLit Award





The poems in Bone Dream are darkly sensuous, capturing the unspoken moments of life through images firmly grounded in the body and the material world.

Relationships, family and death are explored at times through the medium of a dancers body, and at other times through the everyday artifacts we find around us. These poems move, disturb and bring us to realization.

Click to read an excerpt from Bone Dream.

Bone Dream is an apt title for such a genuine and elegant debut. MacDougall weaves together the body and the mem­ory and the myth and the real to remind us that it is not the bone that holds up the body, giving strength to rise and descend, to twist and shift, to embrace and be embraced; rather it is the dream.”—Eric Schmaltz, Broken Pencil

Moira MacDougall is the assistant poetry editor of The Literary Review of Canada. She has had poems published in literary magazines and journals across the country. This is her first book length collection.

Posted in Award Nominees & Winners, B, Catalogue, Poetry, poetrysale, spring 2009, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , |

Boredom Fighters | Ed. Jake Kennedy & Paola Poletto

Boredom Fighters, edited by Jake Kennedy and Paola PolettoISBN-10: 0978335155
ISBN-13: 9780978335151

Price: $10.00
Pub Date: 2008

This collection of graphic poems brings together eighteen works that fall somewhere between a graphic novel and poetic verse.

Participating authors reside across the country and include Derek Beaulieu, Christian Bok, Stacey May Fowles and Marlena Zuber, Tim Gaze, Jake Kennedy, Mark Laliberte, Donato Mancini, Kevin Mcpherson Eckhoff, Gustave Morin, Marc Ngui, Paola Poletto, Daniel Scott Tysdal, Jen Pickering, and Sally McKay.

Their poems tackle the broad topic of boredom: Is boredom a symptom of the absence of love? Does it suggest our present task is too easy?

Inside, graphic doesn’t always trump poetry and thus the ultimate tug of war is in the most captivating sense a real yawnyarn between word and image. We like images and we like words.

With epigonic respect to Dada and concrete poetry and with of-the-moment admiration for the graphic novel we’d like to think (we do think!) editors Jake Kennedy and Paola Poletto have collected something other. They are also flatlanders, mandalas, leg chewers, leaf-shakers, dogs, televisions, bricks, calligraphy, typefaces, remote controls, emblems, tazers, lightning bolts, hotels, and sinking cities. All of them sticking intrepidly an unwavering index into the hirsute gargoyle ear-well of boredom.

Click to read an excerpt from Boredom Fighters.

Jake Kennedy is a poet, prose writer, and teacher. His work has appeared in a number of literary journals and anthologies. His chapbook, Hazard, is published by BookThug. Jake currently teaches in the English Department at Okanagan College.

Paola Poletto is an arts administrator, mixed media and installation artist, writer and curator. Artist-led projects have included Kiss Machine Magazine (co-founding publisher since 2000), Inflatable Museum (on-line exhibit 2001-2004), Girls and Guns (travelling exhibit Toronto-London, 2003; Budapest-Albania-Montenegro & Serbia, 2004), and Robot Landscapes (exhibit Toronto, 2004). She is senior director of programs at Design Exchange, Canada’s national centre for design (www.dx.org), where she oversees youth programs, professional programs, exhibitions, museum collection and research. She is also the director of digifest (www.dx.org/digifest), a festival of design and media culture produced by Design Exchange in partnership with the Ontario Science Centre and Harbourfront Centre.

Posted in Anthologies, B, Catalogue, Poetry | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

GULCH | Ed. Sarah Beaudin, Karen C. Da Silva, & Curran Folkers

DOWN WITH ARBOREAL THOUGHT! // A Steel Bananas Project

GULCH, edited by Karen C. Da Silva, Curran Folkers & Sarah BeaudinISBN-10: 1926639073
ISBN-13: 9781926639079
Price: $18.95
Pub Date: Fall 2009

“From its opening statement, ‘This Book Is a Rhizome,’ to Adebe D.A.’s ‘Poemagogy,’ to John Unrau’s ‘New Age Muskie Considers a Change of Lifestyle,’ Gulch privileges the rhetoric of (and itself exists as an example of) that ever-regenerative genre, the manifesto.”
— Andrew Dubois, University of Toronto Quarterly 80.2

“…the reliability of GULCH is the space it provides for new visions, new styles and new writers.”
Rabble Magazine

“Gulch plays with the idea of collaboration and does it well, with a buffet of new and exciting work from today’s up and coming talent.”
Broken Pencil Magazine

Inspired by the theories of Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari, GULCH: An Assemblage of Poetry and Prose is a rhizomatic exploration of the modern Canadian literary community.

Drawing on the postmodern themes of detachment and disjuncture, GULCH seeks to create an optimistic snapshot of the pluralities and complexities that constitute the post-pomo literary landscape. Focusing on the theme of fragmentation, Steel Bananas members Sarah Beaudin, Karen Correia Da Silva and Curran Folkers have collected pieces from community artists, Professors, lit students, burgeoning young talent as well as established writers in order to compile a collection that resists the notion of wholeness, privileging instead the multiplicity and diversity found in contemporary globalized culture. This assemblage of poetry and prose bares the innovation and cultural critique of post-millennium Canadian writers, and seeks to expose the beauty of discontinuity.

Featuring work from Adebe D.A., Stephen Cain, Ewan Whyte, Spencer Gordon, Chris Felling, Matthew Hall, Daniel Tysdal, Chris Eaton & Virtual Collaborators, Amanda Lee, JJ Steinfeld, Emma Healy, Wally Keeler, Jon Eskedjian, Vincent De Freitas, Craig Alexander, Heather Babcock, Richard Rosenbaum, Jerry Levy, Alex Consiglio, Sarah Beaudin, Ursula Pflug, Kathleen Brown, Matthew Moliterni, Darryl Salach, Shannon Robinson, Miles Henry, Shannon Webb Campbell, John Unrau, Nathaniel G Moore, Zack Kotzer, Firdaus Bilimoria, Jimmy McInnes, Steph Tracey, James Arthur, Melanie Janisse, Corrigan Hammond, N Dana Jerabek, Shannon Maguire, Ryan Tannenbaum, Karen Correia Da Silva, James Papoutsis, Christopher Olsen, Alyksandra Ackerman, Curran Folkers, James Hatch, John C Goodman, Andrew McEwan, John Nyman, Mark Reble, Jamie Ross, Devon Wong, N Alexander Armstrong.

Click to read an excerpt from GULCH.

Curran Folkers, Karen Correia Da Silva, and Sarah Beaudin of Steel Bananas

Steel Bananas is a not-for-profit art collective and culture zine. They publish a rag-bag of contemporary Canadian writers and art-bums on the 15th of each month, aiming to critically and playfully explore contemporary cultural theory and the varying facets of contemporary urban culture. They’re proud to augment all virtual content with print media or in-the-flesh art happenings around Toronto, and to support independent, alternative, and marginal art in Canada.

http://www.steelbananas.com

Posted in Anthologies, Catalogue, Fall 2009, G, Poetry | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Little Venus | Carla Drysdale

Little Venus, by Carla DrysdaleISBN-13: 9781926639048

Carla Drysdale’s poems in Little Venus challenge the reader, tackling the hard subjects of child abuse, sexual exploitation and the failure of some families.

The character of Little Venus runs through the poems burning with rage and want in an incendiary chant that the reader can’t ignore. Little Venus is a haunting collection that will stay with readers long after the last page is turned.

Click to read an excerpt from Little Venus.

Carla Drysdale was born in London, Ontario and was educated at Ryerson university in Toronto as well as Sarah Lawrence College in New York. Her poems have appeared in Canadian and US journals, including the Literary Review of Canada, Canadian Literature, the Fiddlehead, Global City Review, Confrontation and LIT. She lives in France and is the winner of the 2014 Earle Birney prize.

Posted in Catalogue, Fall 2009, L, Poetry | Tagged , , , |

A Thousand Profane Pieces | Myna Wallin

A Thousand Profane Pieces, by Myna Wallin
ISBN: 9780973864533
Price: $5-special sale price
Pub Date: 2006





The poems in this collection are erotic and wry, a first hand tour through the world of today’s woman for whom desire is no longer a dirty word.

Wallin’s poems explore where the sensual woman has been and where she s going. If Candice Bushnell was a poet, these are the sort of poems she would write.

Click to read an excerpt from A Thousand Profane Pieces.

Praise for A Thousand Profane Pieces:

“Wallin’s book is exhilarating: a dollop of sugar-coated acid. Its subtitle should be, Love and the Older, Single Woman: The persona has been hurt, has snapped back, but vows her vulnerability … The tone? Ms. Sylvia Plath Atwood: Satire and Cynicism for the Discriminating Reader. Wallin’s wit exudes wisdom and wrath. Perfect.”—George Elliott Clarke, author of Whylah Falls

Myna Wallin is an author and editor in Toronto. Her poetry and prose have appeared in numerous literary journals and anthologies, including The Algonquin Square Table Anthology, Contemporary Verse 2, Existere, Eye Weekly, Kiss Machine, Literary Review of Canada, Matrix, Misunderstandings Magazine, Nod, Surface and Symbol, Taddle Creek, and Word: Canada’s Magazine for Readers and Writers. She is also the author of Confessions of a Reluctant Cougar. www.mynawallin.com

 

Posted in Catalogue, Poetry, poetrysale, T | Tagged , , , |

Open Slowly | Dayle Furlong

Open Slowly, by Dayle FurlongISBN-13: 9780978335137
Price: $5.00 – special sale!
Pub Date: 2008




Open Slowly by Dayle Furlong young lovers tangle, tumble and dance their way through the urban landscape. They lose each other and rediscover each other in cafes and bars, over lattes and beer while the city watches and waits for solitude to reassert itself.

As the title suggests this is a book to be opened slowly, savoured like a surprise gift from a lover who will inevitably be forgotten, even while the gift remains.

Click to read an excerpt from Open Slowly.

Dayle Furlong studied English Literature & Fine Arts at York University. Her writing has appeared in Taddle Creek, Kiss Machine, The Puritan, Word & The Voice. She works as a literary publicist, a screenwriter ‘s assistant and for Descant Magazine. She has lived in all regions of Canada and has travelled throughout Central America, Asia & the US. She currently lives in Toronto.

Posted in Catalogue, O, Poetry, poetrysale, special holiday sale | Tagged , , , |

Manual for Emigrants | Fraser Sutherland

Manual for Emigrants, by Fraser SutherlandISBN-10: 0973864591
ISBN-13: 9780973864595
Price: $14.95
Pub Date: 2007




In Fraser Sutherland’s latest collection of poems, Manual for Emigrants, all the myriad aspects of exile and belonging are explored in ways both witty and moving.

The voices of the outsider and the voices of those who believe they belong are juxtaposed in an impassioned dialogue that resists conclusion.

Click for an excerpt from Manual for Emigrants.

Fraser Sutherland has made a practice of hanging around people whose first language isn’t his own, and are otherwise as different as possible from him. Which is surprising, or maybe isn’t, because he is descended from an unbroken line of Highland Scots, was born in northern Nova Scotia, and has lived in Halifax, Ottawa, Montreal, and Nelson, B.C. He now resides in Toronto.

Posted in Catalogue, M, Poetry | Tagged , , , |

Eating Fruit Out of Season | David Clink

Eating Fruit Out of Season, by David ClinkISBN-10: 0978335112
ISBN-13:9780978335113
Price:$14.95
Pub Date: 2008

Eating Fruit out of Season is a book that celebrates the natural world of frogs, bumble bees, crickets, ravens, snowy owls, and endless cottage roads, but also the man-made world of museums, broken VCRs, junk mail grocery stores, a high school cafeteria, and bus platforms.

This is a first book for poet David Clink, spanning 12 years of writing covering 40 years of experience, as the author shares with the reader his remembrances of falling out of a tree, days at the cottage, falling in and out of love, and the death of his father.

In employing humour and surreal elements, the poems take place in the real world made new again. The four sections in the book comprise: childhood and youth; the development of self and interpersonal relationships; maturity, loss, and the fall from a height that has been acheived; and finally, the poet’s relationship with his father, up to, including and after his father’s death.

The poems in this debut collection use various poetic forms, including free verse, prose poems, ghazals, and a new poetic form the author has invented called a “Title Poem.”

Click to read an excerpt from Eating Fruit Out of Season.

David Clink is the Artistic Director of the Rowers Pub Reading Series, and is a former Artistic Director of the Art Bar Poetry Series. He has been writing and selling poetry since 1995, and is the author of 5 poetry chapbooks and the editor of 7 others. He is a consultant with the Heart of a Poet TV show, and is co-publisher of believe your own press, a poetry chapbook publisher. He is webmaster of poetrymachine.com, a resource for writers. His poetry has been published in Canada, the United States and Europe, including Analog; The Antigonish Review; Asimov’s Science Fiction; Cicada; The Dalhousie Review; Descant, The Fiddlehead; Grain Magazine, The Literary Review of Canada; On Spec, and The Prairie Journal.

Posted in Catalogue, E, Poetry | Tagged , , , |

The Best Canadian Poetry 2009

Best Canadian Poetry in English 2009
ISBN: 9781926639031
Price: $14.95 special sale price!
Pub Date: Fall 2009




From a long list drawn from Canadian literary journals and magazines, award-winning poet A.F. Moritz, the volume’s guest editor, has chosen 50 of the best Canadian poems published in 2008. With this anthology, readers, often baffled by proliferating poems and poets, will be able to tap into the remarkable and vibrant Canadian poetry scene, checking out the currents—and cross currents—of poetry in a volume distilled by a round robin of distinguished editorial taste.

“The collection is a unique glimpse at a diversity of poets, from Ottawa’s David O’Meara to Margaret Atwood to the revered P.K. Page.”—Cormac Rae, Ottawa Xpress

Featuring work from Margaret Atwood, Margaret Avison, Ken Babstock, Shirley Bear, Tim Bowling, Asa Boxer, Anne Compton, Jan Conn, Lorna Crozier, Barry Dempster, Don Domanski, John Donlan, Tyler Enfield, Jesse Ferguson, Connie Fife, Adam Getty, Steven Heighton, Michael Johnson, Sonnet L’Abbe, Anita Lahey, M Travis Lane, Evelyn Lau, Richard Lemm, Dave Margoshes, Don McKay, Eric Miller, Shane Neilson, Peter Norman, David O’Meara, PK Page, Elise Partridge, Elizabeth Philips, Meredith Quartermain, Matt Rader, John Reibetanz, Robyn Sarah, Peter Dale Scott, Cora Sire, Karen Solie, Carmine Starnino, John Steffler, Ricardo Sternberg, John Terpstra, Sharon Thesen, Matthew Tierney, Patrick Warner, Tom Wayman, Patricia Young, Changming Yuan, and Jan Zwicky.

Click to read an excerpt from The Best Canadian Poetry in English 2009.

A native of Niles, Ohio, A.F. Moritz has lived in Toronto since graduating from Marquette University in Milwaukee in 1974. He teaches literature and creative writing at the University of Toronto. His poetry has received the Award in Literature of the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters, as well as Canada Council, Guggenheim Foundation and Ingram Merrill Foundation fellowships. He has translated books by Ludwig Zeller including In the Country of the Antipodes: Selected Poems 1964 – 1979 and The Ghost’s Tattoos.

Molly Peacock is the author of five volumes of poetry, including Cornucopia: New & Selected Poems, published by Penguin Canada, and by W.W. Norton in the US and UK. She is the Poetry Editor of the Literary Review of Canada. Before she emigrated to Canada in1992, she was one of the creators of Poetry in Motion on the Buses and Subways in New York City, and she served as an early advisor to Poetry On The Way. Peacock is also the author of a memoir, Paradise, Piece by Piece, published by McClelland and Stewart, and of a book about poetry, How To Read A Poem & Start A Poetry Circle, also published by M & S. Her reviews and essays have appeared in the Globe and Mail. Her poems have appeared in The New Yorker, The Paris Review, and the TLS. Recently she toured with her one-woman show in poems, The Shimmering Verge produced by the London, Ontario based company, Femme Fatale Productions. She lives in Toronto with her husband, Michael Groden, an English Professor at the University of Western Ontario. Her website is: mollypeacock.org.

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The Best Canadian Poetry 2008

The Best Canadian Poetry in English 2008
ISBN: 9780978335175
Pub Date: 2008

From a long list of one hundred poems drawn from Canadian literary journals magazines, this year’s guest editor, award winning poet Stephanie Bolster, has chosen fifty of the best Canadian poems published in 2007. With this anthology readers, baffled by proliferating poems and poets, can for the first time tap into the remarkable and vibrant Canadian poetry scene. Readers are invited to explore the currents and cross-currents of poetry in a distinguished volume distilled by a round robin of esteemed editorial taste.

Featuring work from Maleea Acker, James Arthur, Leanne Averbach, Margaret Avison, Ken Babstock, John Wall Barger, Brian Bartlett, John Barton, Yvonne Blomer, Tim Bowling, Heather Cadsby, Anne Compton, Kevin Connolly, Meira Cook, Dani Couture, Sadiqa de Meijer, Barry Dempster, Jeramy Dodds, Jeffery Donaldson, Susan Elmslie, Jason Guriel, Aurian Haller, Jason Heroux, Iain Higgins, Bill Howell, Helen Humphreys, Amanda Lamarche, Tim Lilburn, Michael Lista, Keith Maillard, Don McKay, AF Moritz, Jim Nason, Peter Norman, Alison Pick, E Alex Pierce, Craig Poile, Matt Rader, Michael Eden Reynolds, Shane Rhodes, Joy Russell, Heather Sellers, David Seymour, J Mark Smith, Adam Sol, Carmine Starnino, Anna Swanson, Todd Swift, JR Toriseva, and Leif E Vaage.

Click to read an excerpt from The Best Canadian Poetry in English 2008.

Molly Peacock is the author of five volumes of poetry, including Cornucopia: New & Selected Poems. She is the Poetry Editor of the Literary Review of Canada. Before she emigrated to Canada in1992, she was one of the creators of Poetry in Motion in New York City, and she served as an early advisor to Poetry On The Way. Her reviews and essays have appeared in the Globe and Mail, and her poems have appeared in The New Yorker, The Paris Review, and the TLS. She lives in Toronto.

Stephanie Bolster’s first book, White Stone: The Alice Poems, won the Governor General’s Award and the Gerald Lampert Award in 1998. She has also published Two Bowls of Milk, which won the Archibald Lampman Award and was shortlisted for the Trillium Award. Her work has appeared in literary journals internationally and has also garnered her the Bronwen Wallace Award, the Norma Epstein Award, and The Malahat Review’s Long Poem Prize. Her several chapbooks include, most recently, Biodme and Past the Roman Arena. Raised in Burnaby, B.C., she now lives in Montreal, where she teaches in the creative writing programme at Concordia University.

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The Animal Bridegroom | Sandra Kasturi

The Animal Bridegroom, by Sandra Kasturi
ISBN: 9780973864564
Price: $14.95
Pub Date: 2007

First print run sold out! Books now available as print on demand. Orders may require additional time for delivery.


 

 

In the fantastical world of Sandra Kasturi’s poetry, myth intersects with reality resulting in a unique dream world that even those who generally shy away from poetry find irresistible. Filled with instances of role reversal, shapeshifting and gender bending, the feminist streak running through these poems becomes a bedtime story whose ending is suspect, unexpected and filled with dark humour. Whether running with the wolves, or sleeping with them, Kasturi uses her sly words to turn everyday conventions inside out.  Animal Bridegroom features an introduction by Neil Gaiman

“The Animal Bridegroom is to be revelled in as though you were wandering in a zoo of the most outlandish creatures, stopping often to watch and wonder at their strange behaviour.”—A. Getty, author of Repose and Lyric and Elegy

The Animal Bridegroom is a wonderful showcase for Sandra Kasturi’s work—she has a lot to say and hundreds of ways to say it. Filled with poetry of sheer, spinning invention and genuine passion, none of it comfortable or conventional, this long-awaited book is a genuine pleasure to read.”—Peter Straub, author of A Dark Matter and Mrs. God

“Sandra Kasturi’s magical poems transform the ordinary into the surreal and exotic.”—Phyllis Gotlieb, author of Birthstones and Red Blood, Black Ink, White Paper

Click to read an excerpt from The Animal Bridegroom.

Sandra Kasturi is a poet, writer and editor.  In 2005 she won ARC magazine’s coveted annual Poem of the Year award for her poem “Old Men, Smoking.” She has also received several Toronto Arts Council grants, and a Bram Stoker Award for her editorial work at the on-line magazine, ChiZine. Sandra has three poetry chapbooks published, as well as the well-received SF poetry anthology, The Stars As Seen from this Particular Angle of Night, which she edited. Her poetry has appeared in various magazines and anthologies, including Prairie Fire, On Spec, several of the Tesseracts series, 2001: A Science Fiction Poetry Anthology, and Northern Frights 4. Her cultural essay, “Divine Secrets of the Yaga Sisterhood” appeared in the anthology Girls Who Bite Back: Witches, Slayers, Mutants and Freaks. The Animal Bridegroom is her first full-length poetry collection.

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The Stone Skippers | Ian Burgham w/ an Introduction by Roland Leach

The Stone Skippers, by Ian BurghamISBN-13: 9780973864588
Price: $21.95
Pub Date: 2007

Longlisted for the 2008 Relit Award

In The Stone Skippers, Burgham launches dazzling poems that explore the central core of our humanity upon the Canadian literary landscape.

The poems examine how love is a territory we map with little skill. The speaker returns again and again to the distances we set up or have imposed upon ourselves by relationships of desire and love, all against the motif of conversations inner conversations, day-to-day conversations, one-sided conversations, unfinished and halting conversations.

Click to read an excerpt from The Stone Skippers.

Ian Burgham is an associate of the League of Canadian Poets. In 2004 he won the Queens University Well-Versed Poetry Prize. He is a graduate of both Queens University and the University of Edinburgh, and has lived for extended periods in various parts of the world. He served as a senior editor at Canongate Publishing in Edinburgh during the early 1980s. His poems have been published in a number of literary journals and magazines including dANDelion, Queens Quarterly, Scottish Arts Journal, Harpweaver, and the Literary Review of Canada. Burgham has had one poetry book published in the United Kingdom: Confession of Birds, (2003 chapbook). His first full collection of poems, The Stone Skippers, will be published in Australia and New Zealand by Sunline Press, Perth (introduction by Newcastle Prize winning poet, Roland Leach) and, in the UK by MacLean Dubois Publishers in February 2007 (Introduction by novelist and poet, Alexander McCall Smith). He is currently working on his third collection. Ian works as a volunteer to further the efforts of the Griffin Prize for Excellence in Poetry. He is an adjunct Assistant Professor in the Department of Family Medicine at Queens University.

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Contents of a Mermaid’s Purse | Phoebe Tsang

Contents of a Mermaid's Purse, by Phoebe Tsang
ISBN: 9781926639062
Price: $7
Pub Date: Fall 2009




Poems that are like incantations, love spells spoken in a young lyrical voice. Contents of a Mermaid’s Purse’s poems are an existential exploration of love and mortality via fairytales and nature. Travelling freely among the shattered confines of identity and gender, travel and environment, the dreamlike narrative unfolds in lyric language, telling of love lost and found, and mythologies that inform the journey with passages in the rhythm of fairytales.

Click to read an excerpt from Contents of a Mermaid’s Purse.

Phoebe Tsang was born in Hong Kong, grew up in England and currently resides in Canada. She is the author of the poetry collection Contents of a Mermaid’s Purse (Tightrope Books), due to be launched 05 November 2009. Phoebe’s poetry can be found in the anthologies Garden Variety (Quattro Books) and Not a Muse (Haven Books). Journal credits include Asia Literary Review (Hong Kong), Atlas02 (UK & India), Brand (UK), Room and  Freefall (Canada). Her chapbooks are Solitaires (Lyricalmyrical Press, 2006) and To Kiss the Ground (Press On! 2007). A professional violinist, she is a multi-genre artist who holds a BSc in Architecture from the University of London.

Posted in C, Catalogue, Fall 2009, Poetry, poetrysale | Tagged , , , |

Iron-on Constellations | Emily Pohl-Weary

Iron-On Constellations, by Emily Pohl-Weary
ISBN: 9780973864502
Price: $5 special sale price
Pub Date: 2005

The poetry in Iron-on Constellations defiantly explores the beauty and complexity of the everyday.

Emily Pohl-Weary sifts through the surface dirt, grime and debris of the city to reveal the isolation, illness, love and sexuality lurking beneath. Through short,confident bursts that act like graffiti on an alley wall, her poems reveal hidden layers of emotion and political motivation.

Click for an excerpt from Iron-on Constellations.

Emily Pohl-Weary‘s most recent novel is Strange Times at Western High (Annick Press), a young adult mystery featuring misfit Natalie Fuentes, who solves a crime in her high school. Like the character Natalie, Pohl-Weary’s first publications were in self-published zines titled things like We Have Lives, This City of Faces and Throat Flower. She went to become a co-editor of Broken Pencil, the guide to zines and independent arts, and eventually to publish her own magazine, Kiss Machine. During Kiss Machine‘s eight-and-a-half year run, it also published an award-winning line of comics by Canadian women writers and artists. Her first book was the life story of gender-bending science fiction author Judith Merril, Better to Have Loved (Between the Lines). Merril was Pohl-Weary’s grandmother, and she had started the book prior to her death. Pohl-Weary completed it posthumously in the same voice. It won a Hugo Award and was a finalist for the Toronto Book Award. Selections from her critically acclaimed anthology of writing about female superheroes Girls Who Bite Back: Witches, Mutants, Slayers and Freaks (Sumach Press) were an opportunity for 34 writers to analyse and redefine the notion of powerful women. The year it launched, contributors toured 17 cities across North America, doing readings from the book and running superhero makeovers on the audience.Her novel A Girl Like Sugar (McGilligan Books) is the coming-of-age tale of a girl who’s haunted by her dead rock star boyfriend. Her poetry collection, Iron-on Constellations (Tightrope Books), explores the illness, love and isolation hidden beneath busy urban life. Video artists and stop-motion animators have adapted several of the poems.

 

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