Brown Girl in the Room—Priya Ramsingh

 

ISBN: 9781988040332

PRICE: $22.95



 

Sara Ramnarine is just starting out her career in Toronto, a city that is touted as one of the most cosmopolitan in the world with its motto, “Diversity is our Strength.” As a smart, driven, educated, contemporary woman, Sara assumes her rise up the corporate ladder will be seamless. But she soon discovers that the workplace is full of pitfalls and obstructions, including discrimination and racism. Eventually, Sara is forced to make a critical decision that affects her career and state of mind, risking her reputation for years to come.

“Priya Ramsingh’s Brown Girl in the Room is a nuanced and insightful account of what it means to be a first generation Canadian woman within a ruthless corporate environment. Fearless and direct, Ramsingh presents her protagonist, Sara, as well as her friends and colleagues with an equal mix of compassion and critique, exposing racism, misogyny, and all of their consequences. An engaging and powerful debut.”
Danila Botha, author of For All the Men (and Some of the Women) I’ve Known and Too Much on the Inside

“A storyline that isn’t discussed in popular modern fiction but needs to be told“—Goodreads

“When a book is able to make you reflect on your own life experiences and reminds you of some of the issues that still exist to this day, you know it is extremely well written!—Goodreads

“Ramsingh creates a mostly believable, true-to-life workplace filled with conflicting egos and low-key racism that’s as damaging as anything overt. The book’s message is strong… a worthwhile story”—Publishers Weekly

Since she was acclaimed by her Grade Five teacher for story writing skills, Priya Ramsingh has recognized her calling as a writer. An English graduate from Carleton University, Priya spent twenty-two years in communications, with nine as a freelance writer. Brown Girl in the Room is her first novel.

Posted in 2017, B, Fall 2017, Novels, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , |

Resort—Andrew Daley

ISBN: 9781988040363
Price : $22.95

A thriller, a love story, an elegy, and a confession, Resort recounts the misadventures of actors/con artists, Jill Charles and Danny Drake. Broke and desperate in Acapulco, Danny agrees to Jill’s scamming of an eccentric older English couple, leading them across Mexico to Veracruz.

Along the way, Danny begins to suspect Jill hasn’t told him the truth about herself or the English couple, who may have nefarious designs of their own. Set in Mexico, Toronto, and points in between, Resort is an engrossing, moving, and darkly comic journey through the shadowy side of a sunny world.

Resort is a taut twisty story that starts out being about a life of crime but encompasses so much more: love, literature, and the limits of trust are all seen from new angles. I was enthralled from start to finish.” —Rebecca Rosenblum, author of So Much Love

 Andrew Daley was raised in Orangeville, Ontario, and moved to Toronto to attend university. Aside from a year in England, he’s lived there ever since. He’s done a variety of jobs and seems to have settled in the film business. His first novel, Tell Your Sister, was published by Tightrope Books in 2007.

Posted in 2017, Fall 2017, Novels, R | Tagged , , , , |

Finishing the Road—David Cozac

ISBN: 9781988040370
Price: $22.95



Finishing the Road is set in 1990s Guatemala, where a long, often brutal, civil war persists. The Canadian, French and Guatemalan protagonists travel the country, confronting various questions. How to forge an identity amid an intense sense of rootlessness? Where is home for the lonely and emotionally adrift? How to overcome grief? In his debut novel, David Cozac introduces the reader to a land beset by loss and to people seeking to end their isolation, free themselves of doubt and rekindle human connection.

“David Cozac’s novel reminds us that the bird of Guatemala, the quetzal, cannot survive in captivity. His story pays homage to the flight of the resplendent bird, whose beautiful plumage is echoed in the intricacies of Ixil weaving. In this braided quest story, four individuals seek connection and belonging in the highlands of Guatemala. In prose that flows with the inflections and metaphors of the land, a story is woven of three separate journeys. A teenaged girl takes her brother back to the village from which their family fled a decade earlier. Theirs is the story of persistence in the face of persecution, and an honouring of ancient ways. A young woman seeks to connect with the father she never met by travelling to the places that shaped him. A young man finds solace and direction in her published accounts. This is a novel about healing the wounds of fatherlessness, about the weaving of chance and fate, the wisdom of hope and the potential liberty in following the path of the heart.”—Kelley Aitken, author of Canadian Shield and Love in a Warm Climate

Finishing the Road was, for me, the type of book you don’t want to put down, can’t wait to pick up, and yet, at the same time, you never want it to end.”—James Fisher, Miramichi Reader

Photo by Sharon Ting

Canadian author David Cozac was born and raised in Toronto. He works for the United Nations. In the past, he worked for several human rights organizations, including PEN Canada and Canadian Journalists for Free Expression.

 

Posted in 2017, Catalogue, F, Fall 2017, Novels | Tagged , , , , , , |

The Best of the Best Canadian Poetry in English

ISBN:  9781988040349
Price: 24.95




The Best of the Best Canadian Poetry in English takes the pulse of Canadian poetry with ninety superb poems that have excelled—twice—at the test of “the best.” With poems chosen from the first nine volumes of this landmark series, this special tenth-anniversary edition highlights a vibrant variety of subjects from romance and family to ecology and the economy—not to mention blizzards and bears. Ranging from iconic poets Michael Ondaatje, Anne Carson, George Elliott Clarke, and P.K. Page to notable upstarts, the anthology includes an index for readers, notes from the poets, an illuminating analysis of Canadian poetics by series editor Molly Peacock, and provocative excerpts from past introductions by guest editors Stephanie Bolster, A.F. Moritz, Lorna Crozier, Priscila Uppal, Carmine Starnino, Sue Goyette, Sonnet L’Abbé, Jacob McArthur Mooney, and Helen Humphreys.

For a full list of The Best of the Best Canadian Poetry contributors, visit the Best Canadian Poetry Series site.

“A collection as complex and satisfying as a symphony.” —Publishers Weekly

“A great jumping-off point for readers who might be interested in Canadian poetry but are unsure about where to start.”—Emma Healey, Globe and Mail

“Bits of eternity, arranged alphabetically.”—Merilyn Simonds, Kingston Whig-Standard

“Canada’s most eloquent, profound, humorous and meditative writers, ranging from the seasoned and well known to the new and upcoming.” —Eric Schmaltz, Broken Pencil

“The Best Canadian Poetry series offers an annual sampling of voices and experiences—a little slice of Canadiana that may be appreciated beyond borders as well.” —Lori A. May, Examiner.com

“Buy it, or borrow it, but do read it.”—Paul Tyler, Arc Poetry Magazine

Anita Lahey is a poet, journalist, reviewer, and essayist. She is the author of The Mystery Shopping Cart: Essays on Poetry and Culture (Palimpsest Press, 2013) and of two Véhicule Press poetry collections: Out to Dry in Cape Breton (2006) and Spinning Side Kick (2011). The former was shortlisted for the Trillium Book Award for Poetry and the Ottawa Book Award. Anita is a former editor of Arc Poetry Magazine, and posts occasionally on her blog, “Henrietta & Me: People and other wonders found in books.”

Molly Peacock is a widely anthologized poet and writer. Her seventh volume of poetry is The Analyst, poems about psychoanalysis, poetry, and painting, from Biblioasis. Her recent book of tiny tales is Alphabetique: 26 Characteristic Fictions, with illustrations by Kara Kosaka; she is also the author of a biography, The Paper Garden: Mrs. Delany Begins Her Life’s Work at 72, and a memoir, Paradise, Piece by Piece, all from McClelland & Stewart.

Posted in 2017, Anthologies, B, Best Canadian Poetry, Catalogue, Fall 2017, Poetry | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Best Canadian Essays 2017

ISBN: 9781988040356
Price: 21.95

 


Featuring trusted series editor Christopher Doda and acclaimed guest editor Marina Nemat, this ninth installment of Canada’s annual volume of essays showcases diverse nonfiction writing from across the country. Culled from leading Canadian magazines and journals, Best Canadian Essays 2017 contains award-winning and award-nominated nonfiction articles that are topical and engaging and have their finger on the pulse of our contemporary psyches.

“The house of the essay has many mansions and every door here opens onto one worth entering.” —Toronto Star

Contributors: Peter Babiak, Deni Ellis Béchard, Matt Cahill, Jane Campbell, Leonarda Carranza, Francine Cunningham, Larissa Diakiw, Alicia Elliott, Suanne Kelman, John Lorinc, Lauren McKeon, Susan Peters, Russell Smith, Joanna Streetly, Richard Teleky, Jane Edey Wood.

Christopher Doda is a poet, editor and critic living in Toronto. He is the author of three books of poetry, Among RuinsAesthetics Lesson, and Glutton for Punishment: Hard Core Glosas. His award-winning non-fiction has appeared in journals across Canada and he was on the editorial board of Exile Editions for over ten years.

Marina Nemat was born in 1965 in Tehran, Iran. After the Islamic Revolution of 1979, she was arrested at the age of sixteen and spent more than two years in Evin, a political prison in Tehran, where she was tortured and came very close to execution. She came to Canada in 1991 and has called it home ever since. Her memoir of her life in Iran, Prisoner of Tehran, first published in 2007, was an international bestseller. In 2007, Marina received the inaugural Human Dignity Award from the European Parliament, and in 2008, she received the prestigious Grinzane Prize in Italy. In 2008/2009, she was an Aurea Fellow at University of Toronto’s Massey College, where she wrote her second book, After Tehran: A Life Reclaimed, which was published by Penguin Canada in 2010.

Posted in 2017, Anthologies, B, Best Canadian Essays, Catalogue, Essays, Fall 2017, Non-fiction | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Things Don’t Break—Richard Rosenbaum

ISBN: 9781988040196

PRICE: $21.95




Acclaimed writer Richard Rosenbaum’s short stories range in genre from realism to speculative, and stylistically from literary to experimental. In his stunning first collection of short fiction, Things Don’t Break, readers will discover stories about relationships, robots, videogames, the moon, giant evil chickens, and more.

“Things Don’t Break is an amazing piñata of a book. Crack it open and out will fly all kinds of strange and wondrous things (including a robot or two). A truly smashing collection of stories.”—Neil Smith, author of Boo

“Richard Rosenbaum knows the way people work—the way they love, the way they hurt, the way they break. These are stories that fire on all the emotional cylinders. A Pandora’s box of the strange and beautiful things that live inside us all.”—Ian Rogers, author of Every House Is Haunted

Richard Rosenbaum is the author of the novel Pretend to Feel (Now Or Never Publishing 2017), the novella Revenge of the Grand Narrative (Quattro Books 2014), and of Raise Some Shell (ECW Press 2014), a cultural history of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. He is also a regular contributor to the popular culture analysis website Overthinking It. He lives in Toronto.

Posted in 2017, Short Fiction, Summer 2017, T, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , |

A Moose in the Dark—H.W. Browne

ISBN: 9781988040233

PRICE: $21.95

H.W. Browne’s debut short fiction collection, A Moose in the Dark, questions our ways of knowing. In a world where cathedrals, churches, and temples no longer bind communities, hers is a search for connectivity. Whether a moose prepares the way for old friends desperate to communicate, or a skull saves a child from drowning, Browne’s stories risk the intervention of the uncanny, and immersion in the elements.

“Heather Browne had been known to me as an award-winning poet, and more recently a much anthologized short fiction writer. She has a unique style, meticulously rendering each word for the strongest narrative while maintaining a parallel under voice. Her imagery is priceless. A Moose in the Dark is tight, deep, yet sexy; a pleasure to read, savour, and reread.”—Wayne Curtis, author of In the Country

“Aflame with characters in pursuit of connection and salvation, this fine debut collection is saturated with language that is, like all the best truth-telling, both a conflagration and an inundation: seductive, slippery, and sometimes a little shifty-eyed.”—Diane Schoemperlen, author of This Is Not My Life

“A Moose in the Dark explores the complex loyalties of husbands and wives, lovers, brothers and sisters, sons and daughters. Browne offers a glimpse of the lives of ordinary people—a trucker, a shoe saleswoman, a school bus driver – illuminated briefly in the headlights, moments of disappointment, reconciliation and resignation. She writes those moments as they deserve to be written, in language rich with poetry and lightened by wit.” Kelly Cooper, author of Eyehill

“If you have a house, then there is always something to do—especially when the hours are stretching out in front of you like a long centre line on a dark night on a lonesome highway. In that time, civil dusk, that time just before it all goes black as pitch, you can make a homemade moose call and see what comes. Just as those were Heather Browne’s words, that moose call is exactly what she’s made, and so who comes to it? All those peculiar half-forgotten relatives who are just as human as we are—the quick and the dead, the old folks and the children, the long gone and now. Can Heather’s house stand up to all these visitors? If you run your hands over the wood, you will feel how well constructed it is, how she’s built it solid and sanded every beam. We don’t know if a moose will come or not, but we will. We can all live in Heather Browne’s house because that’s where we are already.”—Keith Maillard, author of Difficulty at the Beginning

“Communication, or the lack of it, is the theme of A Moose in the Dark, Heather Browne’s
debut collection of short stories, in which her characters strive to connect with one another and with the larger world, but for one reason or another do not… glimpses into the tragedies that lurk behind.”—Wayne Grady, Kingston Whig-Standard

“Contains stories that will—more frequently than not—leave you asking questions… which is a good indicator of the author’s short story writing skills. If you like the literary short story genre, then you will enjoy A Moose in the Dark.—Mirimachi Reader

H.W. Browne writes poetry and short fiction and received her Master of Fine Arts degree from the University of British Columbia. She has published several books of poetry, and her story, “Beach Glass,” was recognized as a notable short story by the judges for the 2014 Peter Hinchcliffe Fiction Award. A native New Brunswicker, she now lives in Ontario and continues mentoring creative writers, and of course, learning from the water.

Posted in 2017, M, Short Fiction, Summer 2017, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , |

Seasons In an Unknown Key

9781988040202 Seasons coverISBN: 9781988040202

Price: $19.95




In her latest collection of poems, Karen Mulhallen takes us on a physical journey through the course of a year and on a spiritual journey through many lives. The beauty of birds, the amour fou of the inconstant lover, the rapture of the past in the history of Toronto Islands and of the city of Pompeii. This is a poet at the height of her art, crafting language and rhythm, to mirror the ebb and flow of the scene. A compelling and devastating group of poems.

“Through Mulhallen’s poems we enter ‘the mangled beauty of the world.’ In the small universe of her exquisite urban garden visited by hawks; in the large universe of her language where words, archaic and modern, sing, we share her elegiac apology to our despoiled planet and her need to celebrate the beauty of now, with love and longing.” —Rosemary Sullivan, author of Stalin’s Daughter

Photo by Michael Torosian

Photo by Michael Torosian

Karen Mulhallen was born in southern Ontario and has spent her life as a teacher, editor and writer. She has published eighteen previous books and numerous articles on the arts and culture. karenmulhallen.com

Posted in 2017, Poetry, S, spring 2017 | Tagged , , , , |

Closer to Where We Began

9781988040189 Closer cover

ISBN: 9781988040189

Price: $19.95




Lisa Richter’s Closer to Where We Began is a diverse collection of poetry that follows the speaker on a path of self-discovery. The collection navigates the tension between memory and imagination, between the personal and the political, and the primacy of sensual, sensory, lived experience. These dream-like poems not only concern themselves with the speaker, but with urban and natural environments, friends, family, and lovers, past and present. The poet explores overlapping/intersecting identities that shape and inform us, celebrating the importance of telling our stories as a means of bringing us closer to our authentic selves.

“Lisa Richter weaves time and place with grace and expertise throughout the poems in this her first collection, Closer to Where We Began. Sensual, delicate yet biting, these poems sweep forward and back with energy and insight proving ‘the heart is a finite muscle of blood and music.’ By following the rhythm of each poem’s unfolding we are led to a ‘deeper quiet.’  A rich and resonant book.”—Catherine Graham, author of Her Red Hair Rises with the Wings of Insects

‘”Invoke the light…” writes Lisa Richter, ‘the light that leaves nothing / in its wake that is cold or unkind.’ With a richness in metaphor and a clarity of vision, Richter deftly travels the reader through seasonal tapestries of nature, across many identities, into many cities, and inside the bounds of family. Yet losses, and the world’s coldness and cruelty are not ignored, but rather, their pains and truths explored poetically: ‘the tongue finds its muse in the most sour of ripenings.’ The confidence and tenderness of Richter’s voice, and her mastery of form, makes Closer to Where We Began a rich and compelling read.”—Maureen Hynes, author of The Poison Colour

“Richter excavates memory as a geography forged by the complexities of human relationships. To read her work is to be transported into an alternate landscape wherein each encounter has been dissected and reassembled with a simultaneously commanding and vulnerable acuity.”—Robin Richardson, author of Knife Throwing Through Self-Hypnosis

“Richter’s first book traces an intimate diaspora… These are pieces of young mid-life when possibly a deeper consciousness of death and history twins with continued and reconfigured desires.”—Catherine Owen, Marrrow Reviews

“The poet admits rebellion… She is ‘Taking Stock’ of ghosts without stories… here are allusions to Robertson Davies’ Fifth Business and graffiti in Kensington Market; Where the Wild Things Are, poetry homage based on Evelyn Lau, Kate Braid, Theodore Roethke.”—Anne Burke, poets.ca

“Lisa Richter’s Closer To Where We Begin looks at our world through lucid dreams and then she writes it all down… these poems lit the place up. Richter has a sharp, laser type tongue, even if it often resides in her cheek.”—Michael Dennis, Today’s Book of Poetry

Photo by Matthew Burpee

Photo by Matthew Burpee

Lisa Richter‘s poetry has appeared in The Malahat Review, The Puritan, Literary Review of Canada, The Toronto Quarterly, Crab Creek Review, among other journals and anthologies. She was longlisted for the CBC Poetry Prize in 2015, and won first place in CV2 Magazine’s 2-Day Poem Contest in 2017. Closer to Where We Began is her first collection of poetry. She lives, writes, and teaches English as a Second Language in Toronto.

 

Posted in 2017, C, Poetry, spring 2017 | Tagged , , , , , , , , , |

Prosopagnosia—Ron Charach

proso test

ISBN: 9781988040226

PRICE: $19.95

Riffing on the neurological condition “prosopagnosia” (face blindness), the difficulty recognizing familiar faces, Ron Charach’s new collection of poems explores our struggle to recognize ourselves in others, and to remain recognizable to them across the boundaries of gender, race and religion, health and illness, love and indifference, celebrity and fandom, youth and advancing age.

Praise for Ron Charach’s poetry

“Ron Charach’s poetry—its expansiveness, its general extension of the boundaries (or so-called boundaries) of poetry, its political bite and pick-up from daily life—are all pleasures for the reader.”
Don McKay, author of Camber and Angular Unconformity 

“There’s a quirkiness of perspective in Ron Charach’s work which banishes the world of self-serving earnestness to the margins… I find myself thinking: if the social leg-hold traps we set for ourselves can’t be got free of, at least we can look down and laugh.”
Roo Borson, author of Cardinal in the Eastern White Cedar and Short Journey Upriver Toward Oishida

“Ron Charach is a metaphysical poet, if by metaphysical one means a poet concerned with the role of the human spirit in the great drama of experience. His concern with the complexities of humanity’s relationship to God and Nature make him a poet to be reckoned with.”
—John B. Lee, author of The Widow’s Land and The Full Measure

Ron Charach

Photo by Sean DeCory

Ron Charach is an author and practicing psychiatrist who lives in Toronto. He has lectured in both Canada and the United States on creativity. For sixteen years he hosted a column on medicine and poetry in The Medical Post, where he showcased the work of other physician/poets. His books are featured on the New York University website on the medical humanities and his medically related poems are taught in several medical humanities programs. He has published many letters in Canadian and American newspapers, most often on the subject of public safety.  His 2001 collection, Dungenessque, won the Canadian Jewish Book Award for poetry. Like his psychotherapy work with patients in the creative arts and sciences, Ron Charach’s poetry draws from the twin streams of literature and the healing arts.

Posted in 2017, P, Poetry, spring 2017 | Tagged , , , , , , |