Monthly Archives: March 2011

Sunday, the locusts | Jim Johnstone

Sunday, the locusts, by Jim Johnstone
ISBN: 9781926639369
Price: $7 – special sale price!
Pub Date: Spring 2011




Award-winning poet Jim Johnstone unites science, poetry, and art in an innovative and intellectual examination of the symbolism associated with locusts. A long poem that probes love and loss in fragments of verse and hybrid-media collage, Sunday, the locusts is a post-apocalyptic tour-de-force. Drawing on a variety of disciplines including developmental biology, geology and philosophy, Jim Johnstone and Julienne Lottering blur linguistic boundaries to create a unique collaborative text. Hymn, map, portent—Sunday, the locusts warns against inevitable extinction while also revelling in the vivacity of personhood.

Jim Johnstone is a writer and physiologist in Toronto. He is the author of two previous collections of poetry: Patternicity (Nightwood Editions, 2010) and The Velocity of Escape (Guernica Editions, 2008). His poems have been published in several Canadian magazines, including Descant, enRoute, The Fiddlehead, Grain, Maisonneuve, The Malahat Review, and PRISM International and anthologized in The Best Canadian Poetry in English 2010. He is the founder and editor of Misunderstandings Magazine. See jimjohnstone.wordpress.com.

Illustrator Julienne Lottering was born in South Africa but has been living in Canada and exhibiting in Toronto, Lyon, and New York since 2000. Her artwork has appeared on the book cover of Life and the Sheath of Enlightenment and in Misunderstandings Magazine.

Praise for Jim Johnstone’s Patternicity

Patternicity transforms the mundane into the otherworldly.”—Mark Callanan, Quill & Quire

“I love Patternicity for its dirty noises . . . Jim Johnstone’s forms are shapely, but feral. His music is beautifully rational, complex and charismatic.”—Carmine Starnino

Posted in Catalogue, Poetry, poetrysale, S, Spring 2011 | Tagged , , , |

Strangers in Paris: New Writing Inspired by the City of Light


ISBN: 9781926639321
Price: $14.95 – special sale price!
Pub Date: May 2011




An anthology of poetry and fiction with the city of Paris as its unifying thread.

The stunning variety of writing in this volume addresses the city of Paris in all its complexity, while challenging the mythology of expatriate Parisian literature. The anthology contains entries as diverse and disparate as an excerpt from John Berger’s novel, Here is Where We Meet; Suzanne Allen’s ekphrastic poetry, a tongue-in-cheek take on the nineteenth-century novel by Helen Cusack O’Keeffe; Canadian writer Lisa Pasold’s story of a forced extended stay in Paris; and an interview with the celebrated American poet Alice Notley.

Strangers in Paris presents anglophone Parisian writing as it is today, without the veneer and expectations of stereotypes, romantic notions, or iconic representations. More than anything, this anthology is a landmark, a notice that begs and entices readers to explore the current English-language authorship developing in and about Paris.

“While the anthology features big names such as Alice Notley and John Berger, it is in the less well-known names that we find the most refreshing takes on the city [of Paris]… this anthology is also a celebration of difference, of the clash between cultures, of the creativity that stems from being in an unknown environment.”—Sabotage Reviews

“A wonderful anthology of poetry and prose…  It brought me right back to rain-drenched streets, warm cafes and interesting strangers. I definitely recommend to anyone who loves all things Paris!”—goodreads.com

Featuring work from Suzanne Allen, Mia Bailey, David Barnes, Barbara Beck, Edward Belleville, John Berger, Judith Chriqui, Marie Davis, Sion Dayson, David Eso, Megan Fernandes, Jorie Graham, Jeffrey Greene, Jonathan Hamrick, Isabel Harding, Marty Hiatt, Margaret J. Hults, Andrea Jonsson, Julie Kleinman, Antonia Alexandra Klimenko, Sam Langer, Colin Joseph Wolfgang Mahar, Alexander Kolya Maksik, Jessica Malcomson, Danielle McShine, Alice Notley, Helen Cusack O’Keeffe, Lisa Pasold, Rufo Quintavalle, Alberto Rigettini, Sarah Riggs, Eleni Sikelianos, Kathleen Spivack, Cole Swensen, Elizabeth Willis, and Neil Uzzell.

Editor Biographies

David Barnes moved to Paris in 2003 with the idea of staying for six months. He is still there. He won Shakespeare and Company’s short story competition, Travel in Words, in 2006 and now runs a writing workshop there and a weekly open mic poetry night in Belleville called SpokenWord. His stories have been published by Spot Lit Magazine, Upstairs at Duroc, and 34th Parallel.

Megan Fernandes is a PhD student at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She is currently writing a dissertation on cognitive approaches to twentieth-century Irish and American literature. During her time in Paris, she has conducted research at the Center for Literature and Cognition at the Université Paris VIII and will be published in the upcoming issue of Upstairs at Duroc (2010). She has presented at conferences in the US, Ireland, and Poland and has an essay on Beckett to be published in the literary journal, Miranda (University Press of Toulouse). In 2015, Tightrope publisher her first full poetry collection, The KIngdom and After.

Posted in 2015 sale, Anthologies, Catalogue, Feb 2015 sale, S, special holiday sale, Spring 2011, Valentine Sale | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Roll With It | Heather J Wood


ISBN: 9781926639345
Price: $10.00 – special sale price!
Pub Date: 2011




Figure skater turned roller derby girl Neddy will bowl you over in Heather J. Wood’s uplifting book about growing up and deciding for yourself. Neddy rejects the sacrifices necessary to succeed as a figure skater—early mornings, a diet of apples and celery, and the pressure to perform—in favour of the rough and tumble adventures and fiesty camaraderie of the roller derby community. Her father is out of the country while she embarks on her first year of university, so Neddy is free to consider her guilt about not following in her mother’s footsteps, navigate a new love, and discover who she really is and what she really wants.

“Readers will roll and spin and root for Neddy. I certainly did!” —Sheree Fitch, author of Pluto’s Ghost

“A fun, painful, yet joyful celebration of one athlete’s coming of age, readers will find Neddy’s story of smashing it up on the derby floor irresistibly engaging—this book is for anyone who has ever seized a challenge, put on a pair of skates, or believed in the long shot.” —Ibi Kaslik, author of Skinny and The Angel Riots

“Neddy’s my kind of young woman: fearless, opinionated, and not afraid to wipeout on the derby track. Any girl who identifies with tough, in- your-face heroes, rather than perfect princesses, should read this book immediately. Then go out and buy some roller skates and a helmet!” —Emily Pohl-Weary, author of A Girl Like Sugar and Strange Times at Western High

“This is a great book with a true voice. Neddy’s growing sense of empowerment comes across clearly. She has real-life decisions to make, and she chooses like a real girl would. It imparts a lesson we all need to learn: that no one else has the power to make you happy.”—Jenaissance

“Heather Wood has drawn a nicely rounded character in Neddy. Her inner turmoil is subtly played out… This book is recommended.”—Resource Links

“The writing is solid and witty”—Blood and Thunder

Heather J. Wood was born and raised in Montreal. She now lives and writes in Toronto. Tightrope Books published her coming of age novel, Fortune Cookie, in 2009.

Posted in Catalogue, Holiday Fiction Sale, R, Spring 2011, Teen Titles, young adult | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , |

Contrary | Ruth Roach Pierson

Contrary, by Ruth Roach PiersonISBN-13: 9781926639338
Price: $7-special sale price!
Pub Date: 2011

Longlisted for 2012 ReLit Award




Governor General’s Award finalist Ruth Pierson’s third collection of poetry articulates the oppositional emotions that develop with the loss of a loved one. While humour, fond remembrance, and wry awareness break through, contrariness tinges many of the poems in this collection, a contrariness rooted in rueful self-examination, in feelings of living at cross purposes with the expected and the polite, of seeing the world aslant. At the heart of Contrary is an unflinching portrayal of the emotional maelstrom that overtook the poet as she faced the dying and death of her only brother. These are poems that mount an opposition, poems that contradict and argue, sometimes in jest, sometimes in deadly seriousness, poems that read unexpected messages into paintings and photographs, poems that are attuned to the dialectic undercurrents of living.

Ruth Roach Pierson took up the pen in pursuit of poetry after a distinguished career in academia. Her poems have appeared in ARC, Event, The Fiddlehead, Literary Review of Canada, The Malahat Review, Pagitica, Pottersfield Portfolio, Prism International, Queen’s Feminist Review, Quills, Room of One’s Own, and Vallum as well as a number of anthologies. She lives in Toronto.

Posted in Award Nominees & Winners, C, Catalogue, Poetry, Spring 2011 | Tagged , , |

The Girl on the Escalator | Jim Nason

The Girl on the Escalator, by Jim Nason
ISBN-13: 9781926639-35-2
Price: $10 sale price!
Pub Date: Spring 2011

Longlisted for the 2012 ReLit Award!




From critically acclaimed poet and novelist Jim Nason comes a collection of vivid and affecting stories about the brief moments that change lives. The characters in the book’s eleven stories live in a world upside down. From the young professional who leaves her high-powered job to explore street life as a graffiti artist, to the gay man who falls in love with a woman, to the spin class fanatic who learns that there’s a fine line between fitness and addiction, these excessive and radical characters create pandemonium wherever they go. Inspired by everyday people riding the TTC, Jim Nason has crafted a collection of gender- and expectation-bending stories that reveal the extraordinary and often heartbreaking truths behind ordinary life. Poignant and uplifting, The Girl on the Escalator is a fresh look at the world right outside our door.

Praise for The Girl on the Escalator:

“With an unflinching eye—and evoking ‘lapsed’ territories of Raymond Carver and Norman Levine—Jim Nason guides us artfully, and with cutting-edge wit, through a marginalized world whose quiet, devastating terror is that it may be our own . . . Tough, acutely observed, and tender, the stories in this collection bear the hallmark of a prodigious downtown seer whose unforgettable voice is distinctly his own. A gem of a work.—Royston Tester, author of Summat Else

“Nason’s well-drawn characters push themselves to the limit, whatever the limit, and keep going. One excellent story after another, original and very polished. His descriptions and dialogue are right on target—Nason is a terrifically good writer.”—Elisavietta Ritchie, author of In Haste I Write You This Note: Stories and Half-Stories

Praise for The Housekeeping Journals:

“Nason offers readers a glimpse into characters who are bitter and wise, funny and dignified . . . gorgeously and with grace, glimpses into the beautifully fought lives and deaths of his characters.”—Mary Horodyski, Prairie Fire

Jim Nason’s award-winning poems and stories have appeared in literary journals and anthologies across the United States and Canada, including The Best Canadian Poetry in English 2008 & 2010. He has published three books of poetry: If Lips Were as Red (Palmerston Press), The Fist of Remembering (Wolsak and Wynn), Narcissus Unfolding (Frontenac House). His debut novel, The Housekeeping Journals, was released to critical acclaim by Turnstone Press in 2007. He lives in Toronto.

Posted in Award Nominees & Winners, Catalogue, G, Holiday Fiction Sale, Pride Sale, Short Fiction, short fiction sale, Spring 2011 | Tagged , , , , , , |

Poetry NOW: 3rd annual Battle of the Bards

Ruth Roach PiersonMarch 30, 2011, starting at 7:30 pm
Harbourfront Centre, Brigantine Room
235 Queens Quay West
Toronto, ON

1 stage. 20 poets. 1 winner.

This popular poetry competition returns in 2011 to feature 20 of Canada’s upcoming and established poets. One poet will receive an automatic invitation to read at the 32nd annual International Festival of Authors, AND an ad for their book in NOW!

Poetry NOW is presented in partnership with NOW Magazine and the Harbourfront Centre.

It will feature our very own Ruth Roach Pierson!

For more information on the event and to see who else is participating, please click here.

Ruth’s latest book is Contrary, a poetry collection being released this month.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , |

Freeing Your Erotic Self in Poetry or Prose with Myna Wallin

Saturday, April 16, 2011
12-5 p.m.
Tightrope Books Office (602 Markham Street, Toronto)
$50


“I want to know them well, intimately. I have to be able to describe them.”
~The Diary of Anais Nin, Volume One

Do you feel self-conscious when you are writing sex scenes in novels? Does your love poetry lack lust(re)? The goal of this course is to find a vocabulary for the erotic self; writers will explore ways of describing their characters’ lives fully and unselfconsciously, to enhance the story or poem at hand. Exploring your sensual self can be exciting, freeing. How much is too much sex; how much is not enough? By incorporating just the right amount of eroticism into your writing you will add a level of depth and authenticity to your writing. Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , |

Rowers Pub Reading Series featuring Ibi Kaslik

The Rowers Pub Reading SeriesThe Rowers Pub Reading Series featuring Ibi Kaslik, Alexandra Leggat, and Ray Robertson.

Doors open @6pm, evening begins @7:30 pm – come early for a pint or a great meal!
Free – a hat is passed.

Location:
Harbord House (formerly Rowers Pub and Grill)
150 Harbord St (W of Spadina, just E of Brunswick)
Toronto, ON, M5S 1H2 647-430-7365

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , |

Excerpt from Animal Bridegroom, “The Burning Woman”

The Burning Woman

Listen!
You can hear her pale voice
from within the conflagration.
It always speaks truth.
It always lies.
She cackles like marrow-bone
when she walks.
Her eyes and mouth are open
and burn like magnesium.
She is a contrary Gorgon;
everything she looks at
is forced into frenzied life.
If you are very lucky
and can run after her
until she catches you,
you can put her in a canning jar
to hold in the air:

ablaze of fireflies
to light the darkness.


For more information about The Animal Bridegroom or to purchase the book, please click here.

Posted in Excerpts | Tagged , , , , |

Excerpt from Best Canadian Poetry 2008, “Introduction”

Introduction

As I read 2007’s possible contenders – each on several occasions, to increase a poem’s chances of striking me in a receptive moment – what was I looking for? First: good writing. Awkward or rote syntax; familiar expressions, images and locutions; or random lineation, ruled a poem out. A meaningfully rebellions and distinctive syntax or deliberately dissonant music often riled it in. Second: depth and challenge, be that emotional or intellectual. If additional readings failed to yield new insights and appreciations, but rather, dulled the flash I’d sensed the first time around, the poem lost its Post-it note. Finally, and inseparable from the first two criteria: an interesting, even strange, sensibility or imagination. (As an undergrad, I fumed when one of my instructors remarked that my poems failed to startle. I didn’t want to startle; surely the startle factor was overrated. Only later dud I realize that what I did want to do – to please – doomed my poems to mediocrity.) “Startling” need not imply clatter and flash. I sought poems that excited and surprised me, that felt (boldly or quietly) necessary, often urgent. I sought poems serious and poems frivolous (though seriously frivolous). Those poems that played it safe, that failed to follow through on the risks they initiated, or that took risks apparently for their own sake, without integrity to form content, did not make it into the anthology, though some distinguished themselves enough to appear on the long list. I was without doubt a tougher critic than if I’d been reading fewer poems, but asking myself whether I could confidently put my name behind a particular choice forced me to be discerning.


For more information about The Best Canadian Poetry in English 2008 or to purchase the book, please click here.

Posted in Anthology, Excerpts | Tagged , , , , , , , |

Excerpt After the Fires, “Memory Lapse at the Waterfront”

Memory Lapse at the Waterfront

Dear Jolene,
I am sitting under the tree writing to you. How are you? Well I hope. Over here things are usual. The paper shortage is getting worse and worse, which is why I am writing to you on Saran Wrap. Finding an envelope should be real interesting but I guess it doesn’t really matter, as you will never get this letter any way. I don’t even know whether you are still alive. I don’t know whether California is still there, or whether it finally dropped off into the sea like everyone always said it would. Sometimes I feel like going down to the waterfront, finding a boat and rowing to California, if that’s what it takes. Except of course there aren’t any boats. I can’t even remember the last time I saw a boat.

I like to think of you when I’m sitting here under this tree. We sure had some wild times together, didn’t we kiddo?

Last week the rodents tried to cut the tree down. Of course we didn’t let them. We threw garbage and they left; it never fails. They said they wanted to make it into paper. I don’t know what they’d do with paper anyway, except maybe wipe their butts. Bunch of illiterates. It’s funny about the memory. I can’t remember how long it’s been this way. Sometimes I forget altogether that there ever was a Before.


For more information about After the Fires or to purchase the book, please click here.

Posted in Excerpts | Tagged , , , , |

Excerpt from Be Good, “Prologue”

Prologue: Morgan

Encoding refers to the initial perception and registration of information. Storage is the retention of encoded information over time. Retrieval refers to the processes involved in using stored information.

My mother (always tactless and almost always drunk) says in a long distance call from Toronto to Montreal, “Write it down, honey.”

A pack a day smoker, a functional alcoholic, a broken woman, her insides riddled with disease, her left breast and her uterus removed, always telling me to write it down, as if a script has some grand importance and validity, capable of overshadowing reality.
My reality. Her reality.

“Write it down, honey.”

And I remember they (whoever they are) always said, “Let your reader know where you are coming from and where you are going. Let them know where the end is. Be succinct. Clarify.”

They told me there had to be a beginning, a middle and an end to things, even if you are (as I am) speaking from far beyond and far before the end. When you are naïve and apt to believe, you truly depend on the notion that there is a clear beginning, middle and end.

That there is a truth and a progression among all these recollections.

Perhaps I am not so apt to believe in that kind of truth. I believe that things are much better when broken into pieces, because the whole is deceptive at best.

My past is a carefully linked chain of lies and my present is nothing more than the sparkle of swept dust.


For more information about Be Good or to purchase the book, please click here.

Posted in Excerpts | Tagged , , , |

Excerpt from Best Canadian Essays 2009, “Introduction”

INTRODUCTION

When Ezra Pound recommended that “poetry should be at least as well-written as prose” he confirmed what every journalist, book reviewer, literary critic, and magazine writer already knew: prose is hard work. It can be as economical, sensuous, and bracing as poetry, but, unlike poetry, prose has specific rules and provides specific guarantees. That’s because prose is what you turn to when you want to say something about something. One really can’t afford to be at a loss for words. It is an information conductor: no matter how stylish your sentences, your syntax must serve up clarity not ambiguity.

Prose is also the freelancer’s medium. Written for payment, prose is a product that, in turn, is sold to consumers who inhabit a marketplace filled with distractions. The writing, therefore, needs to be lively and incisive. It needs to act swiftly on the reader. What’s more, people who write prose are people who hustle after assignments. They tend to have a habit of taking on too much, which means they live a life oppressed by deadlines. There’s no time, therefore, to become self-conscious or rhetorical. When such writers get in trouble, they need solutions that work on the fly. But if they’re good, their instinct for expediency shares space with an appetite for artistry. They try to find new ways to build rhythm into their paragraphs. They try to find new ways to construct crisp, well-shaped sentences. The end result is a kind of belletristic grace: writing that wants us to take pleasure in the experience of reading it, but also has an overwhelming interest in making itself understood. This twofold challenge—to hold the reader’s attention, while giving them news they need—is why prose plays such a vital role in building up a viable public culture.

We looked high and low for essays that displayed this kind of prose, from literary periodicals to web journals to general-interest magazines. We were spoiled for choice. “An essay,” said Ian Hamilton, “can be an extended book review, a piece of reportage, a travelogue, a revamped lecture, an amplified diary-jotting, a refurbished sermon. In other words, an essay can be just about anything it wants to be, anything its author chooses to ‘essay.’ ” Hamilton here reminds us that the term is drawn from the French verb essayer: to try on, attempt, put to the test. No surprise, then, that so many of the essays we found revel in the opportunities the form offers as a vehicle for exploration. No navel-gazing, either. Writers delivered their stories from the front lines of human experience. They addressed themselves directly, and fearlessly, to serious subjects. They worked hard to produce original approaches to important, much-covered topics suffering breezy neglect by a bored media. What this book helps prove is that, along with our talent for short stories, Canadians excel at the essay form. We have a knack for open-mindedness, feel uneasy around oversimplifications, try to square any starkly opposed positions. Growing up somewhere between American gusto and British reserve, we are perhaps well-positioned to make balanced, nuanced, valuable observations. We have a built-in appreciation of diversity and culture. We are also, by nature, generalists: we like to know many things about lots of subjects. All of which gives Canadian prose a three-dimensional credibility.


For more information about The Best Canadian Essays 2009 or to purchase the book, please click here.

Posted in Anthology, Excerpts | Tagged , , , , , , , , |

Excerpt from Best Canadian Poems 2009, “Introduction: Canadian Poetry Today”

Introduction: Canadian Poetry Today
The Feeling for Being: Canadian Poetry in a Landscape

Today’s Canadian poetry is an adventure undertaken with brio. Its clarity and surge are evident equally whether its mood is dark or light, its pace meditative or militant. Great human hopes and debates are engaged with an openness that bespeaks humility, but with the confidence that leads an artist to firm outline, to vivid colour and movement. These qualities are evident on every page of The Best Canadian Poetry in English 2009. Let me choose these lines from Dave Margoshes’ poem “Becoming a Writer”:

What could be easier than learning to write?
Novels, poems, fables with and without morals,
they’re all within you, in the heart, the head,
the bowel, the tip of the pen a diviner’s rod.
Reach inside and there they are…


For more information about The Best Canadian Poetry in English 2009 or to purchase the book, please click here.

Posted in Anthology, Excerpts | Tagged , , , , , , , , |

Excerpt from Bone Dream, “The Haptic Sensibility”

The Haptic Sensibility

A dream site where a heart beats
Beneath the rattle of parched leaves.

After Cupid, Psyche begins to grind
the left-over mice bones of her dreams:
from chip to dust, from done to undone
a small pyramid of gray loam forming
heavier than a moor fog, finer than shaved nutmeg.
Her fingertips meld tears and dust into a small basin:

…while Aphrodite, her none too happy
mother-in-law, readies herself for cocktails…

That night, Psyche empties herself of regret.
The basin’s clear as the Aegean.
She drapes the skeletal sapling of her boy-soul
over the sea, securing him with strands
of her strawberry hair to create a bridge
his battered sternum the platform from which she dives
God’s crushing ache in creating paradise.


For more information about Bone Dream or to purchase a copy, please click here.

Posted in Excerpts | Tagged , , , , |

Excerpt from Contents of a Mermaid’s Purse, “The Magician’s Wife”

The Magician’s Wife

When I’m with you I am not myself:
you call me Bella
then all words are consumed
by our kissing.

It’s not that you don’t like to talk.
From beneath a dark-brimmed hat
you hide behind other men’s
philosophies, conjure
the mythologies of stars
on a cloudy night.

Your smile’s contagious
yet I only know the expressions
of your face by touch,
the fluid transformations
of your chameleon skin
each time I draw nearer than sight.

You take me in under
your hunter’s cloak and I
vanish, leave no trace of timed
existence except the memory
of white-gloved fingerprints.

I know better than to ask,
When are we going home?

Not in any room built of our bodies
have I found the arcane fire
you alluded to in dream.

When sky shuts its medusa-eyes
I watch you sleeping
as if the innocence of each
shallow breath could return
the wisdom I’ve sacrificed to be beautiful.


For more information about Contents from a Mermaid’s Purse or to purchase the book, please click here.

Posted in Excerpts | Tagged , , , , |

Excerpt from Eating Fruit Out of Season, “Cottage Road”

Cottage Road

Up near the August cottage, fences separate
the farms, keep livestock from wandering.

I sometimes drive these dirt roads,
the lake disappearing from view,

parents on porches drinking lemonade.
I remember the feeling of drifting home

after witnessing a barn float away
on the mirage of grass, the sky swallowing birds,

and the excitement of a child who wanted
to follow every road to it’s conclusion.

These dirt roads criss-cross every once in a while,
and I notice childhood on clotheslines,

the smell of dirt and rock stirred up,
and the black and white of cows.


For more information about Eating Fruit Out of Season or to purchase the book, please click here.

Posted in Excerpts | Tagged , , , , |

Excerpt from Fortune Cookie, “January”

Friday, January 20, 1989
Montreal
St. Agnes’s Eve – a night when young women dream of future happenings …

In the dying days of the Year of the Dragon, Washington inaugurates a new President. He speaks of “a thousand points of light,” of “a kinder nation,” of “free markets” and of “free men.” He doesn’t mention free women, but commends women who are about to have children they do not want. Dan Quayle becomes Vice President—“the Robin to Bush’s Batman.” Continue reading

Posted in Excerpts | Tagged , , , |

Excerpt from George Fetherling and His Work, “Introduction”

The witness, an Introduction

George Fetherling is what Robin Skelton used to call a “scribbler”: someone such as himself whose compulsive writing is faster than sound. Sound is a problem. Fetherling, the poet/novelist/artist/cultural journalist who has mastered the silent word, switching genres with a click of his many-coloured pen, was born with a speech handicap. He has, in the jargon of the differently abled, compensated, the way stutterers are known to sing or recite poetry fluently even though speech is difficult. In book after book of articulate prose and poetry, Fetherling (the last name is an anglicized spelling of an old Dutch word for scribe or scrivener) sings like a bird with a thorn in its chest. Like children born with learning disabilities who often develop prodigious oral and artistic skills, he proves the adaptability of human beings.


For more information about George Fetherling and His Work or to purchase the book, please click here.

Posted in Anthology, Excerpts | Tagged , , , , , |